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mspecperformance

How important are alignment services to your shop?

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I am trying to do some research on the impact of the alignment service is to repairs shops. If you sell a lot of tires, alignments are important. It also drives a lot of front end work. Its also a service you provide to be a complete provider of everything your customers need when it comes to car care. It is also probably the most expensive equipment you will ever have to purchase. If you guys have alignment racks, or send out your alignments please answer the follow questions and hopefully we can build a healthy discussion on this topic!

 

 

1. Do you have an alignment machine? What kind of alignment system do you have (please be specific)?Do you sublet your alignments? If you sublet your alignments what is the price you pay and the price you charge? If you perform in house alignments how much do you charge? How many hours do you pay your technician?

 

 

2. How efficient and productive are your alignments? How long does it take your technician to perform alignments? Are you doing predominantly 2 wheel or 4 wheel alignments? What are the times for both? Do you have to redo any comeback alignments? If so what are the return rates?

 

 

3. What percentage of your car count do you offer alignments to? What percentage do you actually align? What percentage do you also perform suspension work with alignments? What percentage do you perform tire work?

 

 

4. What is your sales process for alignments? Do you perform an alignment check with your machine? How long does it take for you check the alignment and give a print out to your customer? Do you find this method effective? What percentage do you close alignments with this method? If you have another method or sales process please explain.

 

 

5. If you have an alignment machine and rack, what was your ROI on the equipment? How long did it take you to pay it back? Did you finance? lease? pay outright?

 

 

6. How much do you advertise/market your alignment services? What have you found to be effective?

 

 

7. Do you do pre alignment inspections to check the steering/suspension? Do you charge for this if the person opts not perform an alignment?

 

 

8. Do you perform wholesale alignments for other shops? What price do you charge them? What is your retail price? How many cars do you see for this service?

 

 

 

Please be as specific as possible. Unless you a serious micro manager I am guessing you may not have the figures for the alignment percentages. If you have a guesstimate PLEASE note that it is a guess opposed to actual figures you are tracking. I think this will be a great topic of discussion!

Edited by mspecperformance

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