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mspecperformance

Do you provide/pay for uniforms for your employees?

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Just curious if anyone makes their employees pay for their uniforms (pass along the cost of uniforms to your employees). Thought never really occured to me but a customer had mentioned his company makes him pay for his uniforms (works for a sewer plumbing company). $15 a week he pays.

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