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I went from a dream 2 years ago to opening our doors today. This site has been a tremendous resource and Joe's articles have opened my eyes to many issues I would not have foreseen.

 

Today was just our soft opening but it went better than expected. I have a huge amount of respect for owner/operators with out any employees. We have our tech, shop manager(my partner), and myself(mainly absentee owner). It was a huge learning day with new software(garage partner pro and all data). We had 5 cars 2 being organic and 3 friends and family. We have a timing belt job we are quoting tomorrow as well.

 

The last 3 weeks we spent cleaning, painting, and remodeling the shop from the previous owner who did not do any of those for 10 years.

 

We have had a lot of success from handing out flyers to our neighbors in the many industrial parks around us.

 

here are some before pictures of the shop

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A7DEEEA3-24BA-4A15-84F5-ED4821662225_zps

 

after

E56AD232-ED67-4ED0-8C34-050366B392AF_zps

 

03FDAFDE-2F84-4562-9FC1-177CA4D1FA21_zps

 

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