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I walked into an electronics store the other day and on the walls were large posters of sale items. On the service counters at the register were more sale offerings. There were sale tags on the items on the shelves. I instantly got the feeling of “information overload.”

 

This got me thinking, many of us (me included), flood our customer waiting areas with brochures, posters, flyers, menu boards, etc. How effective are they? Should we narrow our focus on fewer items at a time? Is less, actually more, in terms of how we market our shops?

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