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Employees talking behind owners back

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Recently, I discovered that an employee of ours mocks and makes fun of me (the owner) during my time off. They take my words out of context, poke fun at the way I talk and work the business, and most of all just disrespect me. Should I confront this employee? If so, what do I say? I have had meetings in the past with the techs and tell them if they have any comments, suggestions, concerns, complaints, etc. to come to me directly and it will be handled accordingly. But rather, they choose to criticize my actions, and mimic me.

 

 

Thanks in advance for your thoughts and opinions.

 

 

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