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phynny

Customer repaired vehicle in my lot... Are you kidding me?!

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So we did an exhaust on a truck a year ago and he recently broke a hanger, he calls us and we schedule him so we can just weld it up for him. So we go out to move the truck inside and it won't start... After some troubleshooting we find that the starter is completely burned up. I call the customer and tell him it's going to be $300 for the repair and he says he's going to call his dad and get back to me. A couple hours later I hear banging outside and 2 guys are working on the truck which is on a steep hill and one is underneath and one in front of it! They leave before I get out there.

 

I call the customer and tell him that this is completely unacceptable and he tells me I need to speak to his dad and uncle. I told him its not my problem and to ensure that they do not come back to work on it and he agrees. About an hour later I hear banging again and when I go out they are installing it!! I told them to stop immediately and asked what they were thinking pulling a starter on my property on a steep him and the truck doesn't even have an e-brake.

 

I can't even tell you how mad I was so I told hem to take the truck and NEVER come back. The uncle tells me I have to warranty the work and fix the exhaust! At that point I lost it and told hem to get off my property and never come back and there is no warranty after a stunt like that. The uncle who has only seen me from the shoulders up starts yelling and cursing and starts to get out of the truck to fight me! The guy is mid 50's, 5'8 and weighs a max of 140lbs... I couldn't believe it and I was honestly happy that he was going to try something (I was infuriated, if these idiots would have gotten killed I would've lost everything). So as the guy gets out he sees me across the truck and jumps back in (I'm 6'2 220lbs and was a boxer from 16 - 29, I'm 34 now). So these morons jump in the vehicles and burned tires out of my lot.

 

Just when I think I've seen it all some new level of stupidity rears its ugly head.

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Edited by Jeff

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