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Joe Marconi

Why Make Follow Up Phone Calls?

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Why Make Follow Up Phone Calls?

 

If you are not making follow up phone calls to your customers, you are missing out on a great opportunity to reinforce your culture and brand to your customers. Making follow up calls tells them you care, it builds relationships. It also tells your customers you understand that the relationship you have with your customers does not end when they drive away from your shop.

 

Create a script and decide who will be called. Make this a collective effort with everyone who will be making phone calls. In my shop we make all calls within 72 hours. We don’t call each customer. We call all first-time customers, customer that just had a substantial amount of work done and customers that returned with an issue about work previously done. The person making the call is usually the service advisor who worked with the customer on a particular job.

 

Remember, every point of contact with a customer is an opportunity to make a positive impression with your customer and promote the culture of your company. When people know you care, a relationship is created. And the more relationships you create, the stronger your company.

 

 

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