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This post is a follow up on “Can Anyone Truly Measure Advertising” post started by Joe Marconi, October 23, 2007

 

I am working on a marketing tool and looking for some feedback. Basically seeking suggestions and a “want” list for a tool that measures and shows what advertising actually works (and how to squeeze maximum return from your marketing dollars). Your feedback or thoughts much appreciated.

 

One of the most difficult parts of any marketing is finding out what advertisement works. There is an old joke that only 50% of advertising works – the tough part is figuring out WHICH 50% is working... and then stop doing the stuff that doesn't work!

 

There is an endless variety of marketing options but finding what works in your local area and for your individual business is a big challenge. If you are spending on marketing without measuring the results (shotgun approach) you ARE wasting a LOT of money (and risk being discouraged from essential marketing). While measuring marketing success is not impossible, it can be a huge sink hole of your time and money. The fear of wasting marketing dollars, and the cost of finding what works, are the biggest reason small business owners are reluctant to spend on advertising.

 

I have been thinking about building an easy to use online service that will clearly answer the 50% question (along with providing two other big benefits). The way I envision this solution is there are three things it needs to do for you:

  1. provide quick and accurate measurement of a specific advertisement's effectiveness (response and source);
  2. provide no-cost or “free” marketing by enabling people to share your offer with all their friends (amplify ad reach);
  3. automatically build a mailing list for direct, targeting re-marketing to people who have shown interest in your services.

Why Bother?

 

There is a need. Yes, there are numerous marketing systems available now (Dukky, Hubspot, Salesforce, Infusionsoft, etc.) but they are aimed at high-end of market and require a huge investment of effort and $$$. These services are not interested in the little guy (small business). I feel there is a need for a simple to use tool that provides key information and marketing assistance in a way that doesn't require a PhD to understand, or selling your soul to afford. Simple to setup campaigns. Data presented in easy to visualize graphical dashboard.

 

Your Thoughts?

 

What I would appreciate from you is some feedback. Specifically I am looking for comments on what information or features you would like in a marketing tool?

 

P.S. This is not a pipe dream... I have 35+ years as an auto repair tech, shop owner, technical educator, web developer, and online marketing professional. I understand the auto repair industry, marketing, and web development. A unique combination of skills and experience that not too many people have. So please don't think your comments will be a waste of time... ;-)

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