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Joe Marconi

Customers Putting Off Maintenance

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I am seeing a pattern, and I hope it’s not long-lived and isolated. I don’t know the entire reasons, maybe money, maybe the fact that cars don’t break down as much or maybe the perception is that cars don’t need much maintenance. But whatever the reason, we are seeing many cars with nearly 200k on the clock for the first time that are a mess. We then try to get them caught up with services and maintenance work, it’s a real struggle. Keep in mind, these are first time customers.

 

My concern is that we as an industry may not be doing the best job in terms of promoting needed maintenance. When they arrive at my shop, we do a complete multipoint and customer interview. We reveal many issues that the customer either had no idea or may have declined over the years. We see 10 year old cars with over 175,000 miles with no record of replacing spark plugs and other maintenance items. We even see cars with cabin filters so packed with debris it’s amazing that there’s any air flow throughout the car.

 

Whatever the reason, it appears too much money has been left on the table.

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Edited by Jeff
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