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I think that it is very important for shops to check TPMS sensors BEFORE changing tires to avoid blame for defective sensors.

 

What equipment is your shop is presently using--how satisfied are you with it?

 

I'm considering the purchase of the following KTI tool: http://ktipst.com/index.php?page=press_release

 

And the following system (affordable universal replacement sensors that can be programmed to mimic OEM sensors) sounds great, but I don't know anyone who has used it: CUB Programmable Universal Replacement - TPMS Scan Tool ($650 from Tire Rack Wholesale) and TPMS Sensors ($28 each from Tire Rack Wholesale)

 

Thanks for your help!

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I have that tool and it does not work on many vehicles. I purchased the Bartec and am very satisfied.

http://www.bartecusa.com/?gclid=COqnwbfA15YCFQOIFQodEx9K3A

 

I don't use universal senors. My CARQUEST store stocks most of the sensors and kits. We like to change the valve stems, seal and cap with every tire change. Another good source for tire tools, supplies and TPMS is Meyers. http://www.myerstiresupply.com/

 

Also, you are 100% correct when you state that it's important to educate the consumer about TPMS before working on their tires.

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We use the OTC 3833. Worked good for awhile then started having problems on G.M.'s. We called tech assist, they stated I needed another update. Update was on back order. Took about two months to get the update. Now it works fine. Has an RKE identifier, which we have found to be most of the problems with tpms. Make sure your customers leave the RKE with the vehicle.

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  • 4 months later...

That's great information, we went a little nuts today on a lexus. We have the Bar Tech. It read the fault ok, but re-set was a pain.

 

Thanks again!

 

 

It is a well know fact that Japanese and other Asian vehicles are among the most difficult to reset, the reason is the availability of quality software. Being that ATEQ is the worlds largest OE manufacturer of TPMS equipment for new vehicles, for original vehicle setup at a factory, they have first access to software over all the other non OE tool suppliers. It's a know fact that many of the aftermarket re-set tool suppliers have to rely on buying sensors and then backward engineer them to try and retrieve the operating software.

 

ATEQ's VT55 tool can re-set and upload the TPMS data on more vehicles than any other tool on the market and at twice the speed. Better yet, the update subscription won't cost you an arm and a leg, it's less than half the yearly fee charged by Bartec.

 

www.ateqTPMStool.com

 

When you're ready for the OE TPMS tool, or deside to update limited equipment, we are able to offer special discounts to all ASO members through an in house program. Please call me for details, I'd be happy to explain how it works.

 

Thanks, Gary

1(800) 266-4497

www.GWRauto.com

 

P.S. I wanted to mention that we just finished our new TPMS Sensor Assortment Kit, this program is revolutionary. We have both OE replacement sensors and our patented Universal TPMS Sensor, so you have a choice for your customer. These are not the aftermarket versions so common at local auto parts stores, rather they are built by the OE supplier to many of the largest Asian car manufacturers. You won't have to wait for delivery and pay higher prices for the odd sensors not easily available.

 

www.universalTPMSsensor.com

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  • 5 years later...

ATEQ VT55. I have not had one vehicle I couldn't reprogram/reset with it.

 

I also have a cradle to program the Dorman Multi-Fit sensors. I can actually program these Multi-Fit sensors with the original sensor ID's. By doing that, there is no need to reprogram the module for the new sensor ID. Pretty slick.

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I've used an AUTEL ts401 for years, then... just the other day, I had a 09 Mits. Eclipse to do. I could read the tire sensors but it would not register the sensors to the ECU. Called Autel and asked them "Hey, this here tpms tool says on the first page... Does ALL cars...but it won't do this one." They told me I have to buy a new tool. The MS905 and hook the ts 401 tool to it with the USB that comes with the tool and then I can. Great...another 1500 bucks to do the same thing I did last year without this new tool. hate it hate it hate it hate it. friggin tool manufacturers are like car manufacturers... "Obsolete the parts and change things so you have to buy new"

 

Apparently, ALL doesn't mean ALL,,,, only I suppose.... up to the manufacturing date of the tool. go figure.

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Lately we've been using cloned sensors from auto plus. I call, give them the FCC id#, a programmed one shows up in a few minutes. It saves me time and $.

 

I see dorman makes a 315mhz kit for about $300, at least the industry is heading in the right direction.

 

Ironically the easiest sensors to program are the brown Mercedes Benz units, they are plug and play. Try that with a scion sensor. Ha!

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