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Price Negotiations

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After looking at the ICCU shop in Mumbai India, it made me wonder how the Indians deal with Indian negotiation tactics?  I need a good strategy.  My shop is among a large Indian population and it seems that they all want to negotiate pricing.  So much so that if one doesn't try to negotiate, it throws us off our game!   There are few ways to deal with this:  1) Stand firm, 2) Have a pre-made coupon that we can use to move the price a fixed amount, 3) Negotiate, 4) Prepare for the negotiation with inflated pricing, then negotiate and settle on a job price (that is often more than the non-negotiated price).  

We do #2 and #4 regularly, with a little #1 and no unprepared negotiations (#3).   When we are negotiating, it's always out on the shop floor so that it can be a private conversation.  They always seem to feel better when they "get a deal"!

Any better methods or practices?

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