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wet behind the ears techs hurting local business's

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The town I live in has a college in it that teaches auto, diesel.

My dealings with most of the students over the years has been they don't have the sense to get out of their own way.

These kids come in with hi hopes and big dreams of being the next Smokey yunick, Richard petty  or Don Garlits

Most not all when they are through with schooling or somewhere in the middle decide they know it all there is to know so they open up a rented house one car garage in a neighbor hood which is illegal in my city.

Then they hit the internet and any place they can post a flyer to let people know they do repairs better and CHEAPER than anyone else in the world.

Most these young kids have never wrenched on a car in their life till now and as with most people today the word cheap is like cheese to a mouse they just cannot resist the deal until they get just what they paid for Cheap work.

They can afford to give their work away because they have no bills to pay and most advertise they will put your brakes on for 50.00 dollars.

Some even state they will do the work for X amount of dollars and you bring the parts well if the customers stop and think for a minute they are not saving much if anything at all.

I am now 55 years old I have been at this since I was 2 helping my father off and on in the garage at home then at his business everyday after school and beyond until his passing 9 yrs. ago this April 2017

I still consider myself in a learning mode in life I never claim to know it all but this college in town leads these boys and girls to believe that they can go to any shop small or large and make top dollar right off the bat and never have to work their way up the ladder to get to the top.

Most of these CHEAP shops close soon after they open or after the kids graduate school and they head back to where they came from or to bigger cities and then they leave you to deal with the customers who left you just because they thought they could get the same quality of service they got from you but at a cheaper price.

But its like I have said many many times cheaper is not always better Kelly bluebook and the Nada are guides NOT GOSPEL on used car prices.

I just wish this college would not fill these kids heads with top of the ladder dreams when most are not even ready to start the climb

 

 

  

 

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