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Feedback on new logo for our general repair shop, Please vote!


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Design ID #14282839   I like this one.. Think it leans more towards auto repair , where the others seem more generic . This one with the wrench, piston, and clutch steel lets you know it is auto repair even if you can't read English. That would be my pick

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2 hours ago, skm said:

Design ID #14282839   I like this one.. Think it leans more towards auto repair , where the others seem more generic . This one with the wrench, piston, and clutch steel lets you know it is auto repair even if you can't read English. That would be my pick

I also vote this one. Who designed these? The proofs look similar from when I got my logo designed. Wondering if it's the same person

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Great designs overall. I'm not a fan of the cursive font. It would be hard to read from the road at any kind of speed.

I like Alex's pick and Harry's pick. Alex's pick certainly conveys the message better than most, Harry's pick is just clean and easy on the eyes.

I'd want to scale a few of those up and see what they look like from the road. How eye catching is it when driving by and not thinking about auto repair? I think I might also experiment with other colors. The colors you picked are easy on the eyes, but may blend into the background a little too much. I'd want a bold color that stands out.

It seems that most of the time logo designers think about how it's going to look on letterhead, but where it really has to look good is on the single most expensive piece of advertising you'll buy. The sign by the road.

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I like the one xrac chose, however there was one that the wrench came in sideways like an e, HOWEVER I also do not like the cursive font on that logo.  Use the font for essential in the logo with the wrench and piston in that choice and it would work better.  Essential should be a simple font.

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Had a quick look at all of them. My first questions (when it comes to design) are:

1) Does it convey the message QUICKLY - in just a quick glimpse

2) Will it easily reproduce in both full color and black and white?? I ask that because a lot of direct mail utilizes copy (quick printing) in black on colored paper. If your logo is too "busy" or too many colors, it makes that harder to do.

Also noticed... funny thing... that "AUTO CARE" is the smallest part of the logo. Hmmm....

Hope this helps!

Matthew Lee
"The Car Count Fixer"

Fix Your Car Count in 17 Minutes... Guaranteed!
The Official Guide to Auto Shop Marketing
The Auto Shop Owner's Unfair Advantage!

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      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
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