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Jay Huh

BANNING the word "DIAGNOSTIC"

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So I watched this teaser video from last years 2016 Ratchet + Wrench conference. The guy is banning the word "diagnostic."

Personally I think the guy is GENIUS.

Diagnostic is such a watered down term now. People think the guys at Autozone "diagnose" their cars for free.

I've told my advisors and techs to use the terms "test" and "analyze" like the guy mentioned in the video.

For example, if customer comes in for an overheating issue and wants to know why: previously we said "it'll be $38 to diagnose why your car is overheating." Problem with this is that it could be so many different things, if we use the words  "test" and "analyze" it becomes:

"Hey John, we need to TEST your cooling system by pressurizing it and ANALYZE it for any leaks. It'll be $38 to do this test." This is GENIUS! Why? because the customer will be happy because he knows what we are testing and feels that his money is being well spent instead of a "diagnostic" which conjures up images of a guy just sticking the code reader to the obd port.

If it ends up NOT being a leak: "Hey John, we tested the cooling system and the good thing is, there's no leak. WE need to now make sure you are getting good coolant flow and test to make sure there's no clog in the lines... or test the water pump.... test head gasket by anazlyzing combustion bubbles entering the system... etc"

Let's be honest, how many times have we pulled out our hairs diagnosing vehicles and only getting paid/charging .5?? Not only do we get what we deserve with "test" and "analyze" but the customer is happy too! 

Can anyone that went to the conference last year chime in?? This is from watching the first 7min of the video (have to pay to watch the rest, which I don't mind but thinking about buying the all access pass for 2017) and I'm thinking this is where the instructor was heading.... correct me if I'm wrong and what do you guys think??? Let's get some good discussions going

Edited by Jay Huh
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