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Great Tire Deal

I gave a $400 tool allowance and paid for $100 ASE training course. I wanted to give a cash bonus, but I knew it would go to a new cell phone or toy. Plus, he geta a $200 bonus and a raise with each ASE, so he'll ultimately get cash

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I am not an advocate of different levels of Christmas bonus as long as the employee has been employed all year I feel they all contributed to the success of the shop so they all deserve the same bonus. Actually doesn't the $10.00 an hour guy deserve it more because he is making you more money per hour?

$500.00 to my techs this year.

Dave

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I am not an advocate of different levels of Christmas bonus as long as the employee has been employed all year I feel they all contributed to the success of the shop so they all deserve the same bonus. Actually doesn't the $10.00 an hour guy deserve it more because he is making you more money per hour?

$500.00 to my techs this year.

Dave

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I imagine every shop is set up differently. Hourly, salary, some work more hours than others. There are many reasons for paying everyone differently.

 

And no, my $13.50 guy doesn't make me the same as my $20 an hr guy. That's why he's only paid $13.50 an hr. I've profited almost $100,000 from my top guy than my bottom guy.

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Lead tech gets $500. This year a dealer I worked with offered him $25 a week for the ten weeks leading up to christmas if he busted but and I offered to match it so he is getting 1k. 300 to my c tech who started in october and 200 to my c tech that just started. Dont forvet yourselves. 1k to me 300 to the wife. Just enough as a bundle to wipe out the remaining corporate profit this year.

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Wow I was generous I guess. Each employee got 1 weeks average pay paid in check with taxes paid one week before Christmas. I didn't have anyone with less than 5 years working for me so didn't have to worry about figuring out what the 'new' guy should get. I looked at it like these guys work hard for me, make me a really decent income and I wanted them to stay working for me.The money would not change my life style one bit, but they could use the added money and besides, it felt good to shake their hands and say Merry Christmas!

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
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