Quantcast
Jump to content


smoke machine


Recommended Posts

Great Tire Deal

I have an older snapon smoke machine I got a good used deal on from the snapon truck. Has to blow smoke out a hose. Got mine a year ago and can't believe how often I use it. Intake leaks, exhaust leaks, gas tank leaks on small engine tanks. And of course, evaporated leaks. Could never go back to not having one.

 

Sent from my SM-N920V using Tapatalk

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Re: Smoke machines. We make a lotta money with our smoke machine. I don't remember what brand it is, because to me they're all the same. They make smoke and it flows into the system you're checking, and wherever it comes out is where you put the fix!!

 

When a car comes in with the "service engine" light on, and we read an evap leak, we explain that we need to hook up the smoke machine to the car, and it's $89.95 to smoke it.

 

 

Cha-Ching$$

 

Hi-Gear

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

For the record is difficult to accurately diagnose evap codes without it. The other uses like lean codes, wind inside the car all are super useful. Had a 1995 Buick with lean codes. Thought since it was old it was gna be easy to check for vac leaks.... Car spray the hoses. We'll after chasing my tail I put the smoke machine to use. 3 tiny hoses were cracked.... Fixed in 5 minutes once bought some more hose. In conclusion, this isn't just for new cars, it's for anybody who is SERIOUS about diagnostic and accuracy!

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I have the cheaper snapon, it was $1300 or so. Before that I had a DIY machine for about 2 years. Before that I would fill the evap systems with 1.5psi of air and use soapy water to find leaks. Both worked, but the snapon is much easier.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whatever smoke machine you get I would suggest you charge a separate fee for that test alone or package it together with a series of tests. For instance we package a smoke test into our level 1 diag which comes out to $150 before tax and fees. We used to charge $99-119 alone for a smoke test but we have since developed a tiered system for our diag process which makes us more profitable, streamlines the process, and has much more detailed explanation of all the tests and procedures we are doing which equates to value for our clients.

 

 

We have both an OTC smoke machine (which I'd like to upgrade) for our regular smoke tests and also a high PSI smoke machine by redline for boost leaks.

Edited by mspecperformance
  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

Whatever smoke machine you get I would suggest you charge a separate fee for that test alone or package it together with a series of tests. For instance we package a smoke test into our level 1 diag which comes out to $150 before tax and fees. We used to charge $99-119 alone for a smoke test but we have since developed a tiered system for our diag process which makes us more profitable, streamlines the process, and has much more detailed explanation of all the tests and procedures we are doing which equates to value for our clients.

 

 

We have both an OTC smoke machine (which I'd like to upgrade) for our regular smoke tests and also a high PSI smoke machine by redline for boost leaks.

A little off topic but how do you structure your diagnostic tiers? I need to find a better way to bill diagnostic time, especially a way to give the customer an idea of what they are in for before the job starts. Currently we bill most diagnostic fees hourly and tell the customer they should be prepared for at least an hour of time. I'm sure there is a better way though.

 

 

 

As for a smoke machine, get one, who cars what brand. I can't imagine getting by without one. We have an OTC and it gets used nearly every day. To be safe you should get a nitrogen generator or a smoke machine that has one built in. Its technically dangerous to pump a fuel tank full of compressed air. Most modern cars have pump modules so the pump is never exposed to air but if you try it on something old there is a chance for explosion if you're not using nitrogen. I use the machine to find intake air leaks on metered air systems. Probably the #1 cause of fuel trims being long.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 4 weeks later...

Agree with Redline. Yes, we fix cars & make a ton of money with it. Use it almost every day.

Start at 1.0 labor charge for smoke test plus for the initial code check then go from there for repairs.

Dave

Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 1 month later...

Hello Everyone,

 

If you are able to buy any sort of smoke machine, you are lucky because most people use a cigarette or anything to produce smoke. If you do have the extra hundred bucks to spend than you can find great deals on craigslist or any classified website. My smoke machine is simple and does the job to catch for emission leaks. Most cars have an area were you can connect the hose. In most cases it's located under the hood and covered with a green top screwed on.

 

Good Luck!

Erik Gonzalez

 

EEE Auto Repair in Tracy

24/7 Roadside Assistance & Towing in Tracy

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Available Subscriptions

  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
  • Similar Topics

    • By Changing The Industry
      NOW is the time to register!
    • By Changing The Industry
      The Biggest Reason Why Small Auto Repair Shops Fail
    • By carmcapriotto
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA Auto Care Customer service is the backbone of any successful auto repair shop. Tom Petty discusses the critical role of clear, effective communication with customers. And guess what? It all starts with your internal team and company culture. Tom Petty, Petty Motorworks, Waretown, NJ Show Notes
      Watch Full Video TST Seminars: https://www.tstseminars.org/ NAPA Auto Care Gold status (00:01:24) Tom Petty discusses NAPA AutoCare Gold status and its significance. Technical training and progression (00:03:13) Tom Petty's technical training and progression through the years. Family business and technical training (00:04:22) Tom Petty's decision to start a family business and his involvement in technical training. Engaging technicians and setting shop culture (00:05:44) Discussion on setting the culture for a shop and engaging technicians in training. Apprenticeship and mentoring (00:08:13) Tom Petty's approach to apprenticeship and mentoring young technicians. Automotive vocational education (00:11:10) Discussion on the need for a specialized automotive charter program in vocational education. Challenges in the automotive industry (00:13:03) Challenges faced by young technicians in the automotive industry and the need for development and support. Starting wage and labor margin (00:14:36) Discussion on starting wage for technicians and the importance of labor margin for business sustainability. Post-education career advice (00:15:31) Tom Petty's advice for students coming out of a two-year automotive program regarding starting wage expectations. Structured Raises (00:15:37) Discussion about implementing structured raises for technicians to prevent wage suppression. Setting Technician Wages (00:19:06) Discussion on the importance of setting technician wages based on experience and productivity. Communication and Customer Service (00:23:53) Importance of effective communication, especially through digital inspections, and its impact on customer service. Training Alliance (00:28:00) Formation of an independent training alliance to improve technical training in the local area of New Jersey. Kidney Donation (00:30:44) Tom Petty's kidney donation. Life Post-Surgery (00:33:14) Tom Petty shares his experiences after kidney surgery and discusses the minimal impact on his daily life. Avoiding NSAIDs (00:33:53) The importance of avoiding certain pain medications for kidney health, with a cautionary example. Recovery and Kidney Function (00:34:31) Insights into the recovery period after kidney surgery and the remarkable adaptability of the kidney.
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA Auto Care Learn more about NAPA Auto Care and the benefits of being part of the NAPA family by visiting https://www.napaonline.com/en/auto-care Connect with the Podcast: -Follow on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsRadioPodcast/ -Join Our Private Facebook Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1734687266778976 -Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/carmcapriotto -Follow on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carmcapriotto/ -Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/remarkableresultsradiopodcast/ -Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RResultsBiz -Visit the Website: https://remarkableresults.biz/ -Join our Insider List: https://remarkableresults.biz/insider -All books mentioned on our podcasts: https://remarkableresults.biz/books -Our Classroom page for personal or team learning: https://remarkableresults.biz/classroom -Buy Me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm -The Aftermarket Radio Network: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com -Special episode collections: https://remarkableresults.biz/collections  
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By Hands On
      Hi folks. A quick search and I did not see any recent alignment machine posts. I have a quote from Hunter, $86,000 includes a scissor life and the concrete work to flush mount it, shipping, the machine with wall mount cameras. Some accessories. If I do conservatively 3 alignments a week my break even is approx 4.5 years, a bit longer depending on financing cost.
      I lease my shop, and one of my biggest fears has been getting kicked out of here. Should I be looking at obtaining a location instead? I am always nervous about taking on the massive cost of a bigger building, especially when I struggle so often to hire good people. I talked to a friend that went from a small shop like I have to a larger facility and he said it was a lot more headaches with very little increase in income. I want less headaches, less stress.
       
      Maybe it is my small shop that makes it hard to hire? Is this the right time to try to get a new location? How do I even start finding financing, I do not have a ton of cash saved up right now. Should I get the alignment machine now, and continue to save up for a new location? How much do I need down for a new spot? Should I keep my eye open for other shops that might fail in the coming year and hold off on the alignment machine and continue to stack cash? I am kind of tired of loosing an employee for 30 minutes to an hour to run an alignment across town that may or may not get done to the same quality standards I hold my employees to.
    • By carmcapriotto
      Thanks to our partners, NAPA TRACS and Promotive
      Did you know that NAPA TRACS has onsite training plus six days a week support?
      It all starts when a local representative meets with you to learn about your business and how you run it.  After all, it's your shop, so it's your choice.
      Let us prove to you that Tracs is the single best shop management system in the business.  Find NAPA TRACS on the Web at NAPATRACS.com
      It’s time to hire a superstar for your business; what a grind you have in front of you. Great news, you don’t have to go it alone. Introducing Promotive, a full-service staffing solution for your shop. Promotive has over 40 years of recruiting and automotive experience. If you need qualified technicians and service advisors and want to offload the heavy lifting, visit www.gopromotive.com.
       
      Paar Melis and Associates – Accountants Specializing in Automotive Repair
      Visit us Online: www.paarmelis.com
      Email Hunt: [email protected]
      Get a copy of my Book: Download Here
      Aftermarket Radio Network
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio


  • Our Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...