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Gavilan

Hi, my name is Gabe.

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Hi. I am trying to open up my own shop. Glad I found you guys. Thank you for all the wonderful information you all have shared here.

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  • Similar Topics

    • By Elite Worldwide Inc.
      Keep Your Shop's Summer Momentum Going! 
      Elite's Supercharge Your Shop, a series of 4 live online courses for shop owners, starts Sept 14th! 
      Learn to master your shop's numbers, recruit the top techs & advisors, maximize employee productivity, fill up your bays with your ideal customers and more!
      These live online courses will be taught by industry superstars Joe Marconi and Kevin Vaught, who have both experienced extraordinary success as shop owners, so everything you'll learn has been proven to generate extraordinary real world results!
       You have the option to either enroll in the whole Supercharge Your Shop course series, or pick and choose the individual courses that will help your shop the most. Here's the course schedule:
      Sept 14-15 - Mastering Your Shop's Numbers and Cost Control
      Sept 16-17 - Hiring America's Top Techs & Advisors
      Sept 21-22 - Maximizing Employee Morale, Productivity and Profits
      Sept 23-24 - Filling Up Your Service Bays with the Ideal Customers
      To enroll in the complete series of these 4 live online courses, just visit our Supercharge Your Shop Page to reserve one of our last openings!
       
       
    • By Joe Marconi
      We, automotive shop owners of America,  must take the opportunity of a lifetime and turn it into a bunch of success stories. What opportunity?  Look around you. The world is in turmoil. COVID-19, social unrest, uncertainty about the presidential election, the economy, how are we going to get out kids back to school, on and on and on.
      While the world is spiraling out of control, we have the power to make big changes to our auto repair shops.  And it can all be positive! 
      The Opportunity...
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      Second, Uber, taxis and limo companies are suffering.  Guess why?  
      Third, the motoring public in the foreseeable future will be traveling by car, taking road trips like they have never did before.
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      Fifth, as the cars get older and older, more of them will be out of factory warranty.
      Sixth, independent auto repair shops have a vast amount of training, resources and replacement parts.
      Seventh,  the overwhelming majority of cars being build and sold today are still internal combustion engine powered cars. If you factor in the expected average age of car these days, we can safely bet that those gas engine cars being sold today will still be on the road in 2033 and beyond! 
      Eight, You need more?  That's not enough! 
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    • By Joe Marconi
      Most of you probably already know what I am about to say:  The Service Advisor position is the most crucial position in the shop.  I know, I know, what about the mechanical work done by the techs?  Well, that's important too, of course. 
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    • By DiscoDave
      I am helping a growing business to be more efficient.  As part of this, I am looking at a service to maintain our general hardware and supplies.  The shop needs a manager as the owner is too involved with the shop - and rightly so as he is highly respected in his arena.  That's another discussion.
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    • By Joe Marconi
      After a recent trip to California (Yes, in spite of COVID-19, I went to visit my family and grand-kids) I found that complacency has set in with many people. I thought that due to the current economic state for so many businesses, those that are working would be on high alert to go above the norm and provide an extra level of amazing customer experience. I found the opposite. 
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      We went to a restaurant in L.A. Outside dining only. We were herded like cattle through roped walkways, to our table and everyone spoke in a monotone voice, as if to say to us, "Why are you here? Can't you see we don't want to be here." 
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    • By spanner
      Hi all, 
      First time poster and glad to be here.
      I'm a 40 something entrepreneur not currently in the auto repair business but I've been exploring shop ownership for several years.
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    • By RiverhillAutomotive
      In may I quit my job of 9 years and purchased an auto repair shop. I was previously employed as a field mechanic for Cummins. At my shop we focus on general repair. It's been a whirlwind since I bought the place but i couldn't be happier to be here. I've included some pictures of the shop. 







    • By abs
      Hi!  I'm looking to open a new automotive repair shop and I could use some help assessing a specific opportunity from the experts here.  To put this in perspective, I would be a new owner without prior repair shop experience, however, I understand repair work and have done almost all of my own work on my personal vehicles for nearly 30 years.  The scope of work I have personally performed included transmissions swaps, suspension, brakes, ignition systems, fuel systems, computer diagnostics and so on.  My formal training is in science and management and I've been in corporate positions for 20+ years.  I also have experience running my own real estate rental business.  I've always been interested in auto repair and I believe this business would be a very good fit for my aptitude, skills and experience.  I would plan to operate as the business owner and bring in skilled staff to handle repairs and customer engagement under my leadership.
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    • By jfuhrmad
      I feel like my area is extremely competitive.  My area is a small town with about 8000 households (includes town and rural areas).  We have 6 legitimate 4-8 bay shops, 1 Chevy dealer, and at least 3 hole-in-wall/backyard guys (800 households/shop).  The next town over has 8000 households, 1 legit 8 bay shop, 0 dealers, and 2-3 hole-in-the-wall/backyard guys (2-3000 households/shop).  Just wondering what some of you are dealing with out there so I have some reference point.  Also, for those of you with multiple locations, does this sort of thing impact the success of individual locations?
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