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How Competitive is Your Area?


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I feel like my area is extremely competitive.  My area is a small town with about 8000 households (includes town and rural areas).  We have 6 legitimate 4-8 bay shops, 1 Chevy dealer, and at least 3 hole-in-wall/backyard guys (800 households/shop).  The next town over has 8000 households, 1 legit 8 bay shop, 0 dealers, and 2-3 hole-in-the-wall/backyard guys (2-3000 households/shop).  Just wondering what some of you are dealing with out there so I have some reference point.  Also, for those of you with multiple locations, does this sort of thing impact the success of individual locations?

Edited by jfuhrmad
typo
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  • 7 months later...

I do not know what out bay per car is, but I do know people have to drive past 80 shops to get to my little hole in the wall on the outside of town

One good thing is there is another town forming to the east of me so I will be dead center of to very big towns

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