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As shop owners, we need to know the numbers of the business. We need to know when we are profitable, what margins we need to make on parts and labor, and continuously monitor and measure the performance of each employee.

 

But, if your focus is only on the numbers of the business, you will sight of the most important component of your business…your employees. And you will struggle.

 

People are driven not by numbers, but by emotions. Oh, everyone may say they work for money, and to a certain degree, that is correct. But to truly have a workplace environment that is united and all pulling in the same direction, you must put people first, quotas second.

 

When you put people first, the group becomes strong. Everyone feels that what they do matters. Everyone feels that the shop owner is interested in them as a person, not a number.

 

Reach out to your employees as people. Create a workplace environment where everyone feels secure. Create the feeling of family. You do this, you will build a powerful team. And the numbers? When everyone in your shop works as a family unit, the numbers and profits will take care of themselves.

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