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Hello all,

 

I would like some feedback as to how other shops would handle this matter. We have noticed quite a few vehicles coming in with repairs that also have other severe problems- vcg leaking, torn up belts, pads almost metal to metal. It is our policy not to allow customers in the work area at all, and it is strickly enforced due to an incident in the past.

 

My question being, if you see something as noted above (or even a dent/scratches), do you take any further steps besides documentation on the work order? ie pictures and save it to the account to prevent any future problems? We currently write it on the RO with a "refused" next to it for problems and mark the areas were dents/scratches are on the vehicle. We really like the idea of pictures, but it also involves time and money.

 

Yes, we try to sell these items as it relates to the safety factor, but some customers just do not seem to grasp the concept and accept the vehicle as is.

 

 

Thanks for your thoughts and opinions in advance.

 

-Nick

 

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