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Technician Interview Process


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When you all interview a potential technician, do you have a specific series of technical/behavioral questions you use to determine his/her diagnostic aptitude? The reason I ask is we have had technicians in the past who have been mechanics for 10+ years but after hiring them we find out they are not very strong in diagnostics, especially electrical. Just trying to see if there was something you all do during the interview process that helps you identify if the candidate is going to be strong in diagnostics.......

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The few people I have had apply I always put through a working interview. I always have at least 1 car that I am flipping and have them do a repair to the vehicle. One guy that I though was more of a parts changer I put on head gaskets on a toyota 3.4 and now I have to put it back together.

 

Another one said he was a good electrical guy and I pulled the ATC fuse on a chevy truck and the service 4WD light came on. He scanned it, had no communication, sat down in front of a wiring diagram and then walked over to the truck to look for the fuse and saw where I pulled it. He got a job.

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I just spoke to my lead technician today and we are going to implement that idea on my personal vehicle for our next interview with a potential technician. I think it will give us a better understanding of if the technician's thought process for diagnostic work is what we are looking for or not.

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That's why I insist on ASE certification. In my opinion the company lacks severely in marketing us but if a guy can't pass the tests I don't want him working on my car. The tests are easy for anyone who knows what they are doing. I hire people that are ase certified and can pass a drug test, that last one seems to be the most difficult for some. Lately I've put new hires on a 2-4 week trial, their work ethic and attitude shows itself quickly. Everyone starts like I did, at the bottom. Some guys are too good to sweep or fix flats, they would prefer to watch the guy who signs their checks do the bs work. Lol

 

I like the idea of the skills test, but do you pay the applicant while he's proving himself?

Edited by alfredauto
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5 star, I developed a pre employment questionnaire for a client that asks specifically about their experience with the following scale.

 

1. no experience

2. not frequently performed

3. need help performing

4.. need little help

5. no help needed

 

Next I have questions about 20 plus tasks routinely done at this shop. Then a technician tool inventory , ASE Certs, 20 ASE style questions that indicate specific skills for this shop. This is filled out with the application on site and never leaves the shop.

 

The following admonishment is listed at the top :" Failure to answer the following questions truthfully could result in reduced wages or termination if you are hired and it is discovered you were not truthful" .

 

 

This has help the shop enormously, After reviewing a few of these you will interview ONLY the great applicants .

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Passing a drug test is the biggest hurdle.

Is there a drug test you can test someone to see if they are doing drugs on the job? No there isn't. What someone does at home is there business is it not. Until there is a test that will I don't support these so called drug test. Don't you think its against peoples rights?

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So I have a tech coming in for an interview this Friday so I decided to put together my own written test. I tried to attach it, but I received an error. Here it is pasted below for you all to use:

 

 

 

1. Technician A says constant-running release bearings are used with hydraulically controlled clutches. Technician B says release bearings move away from the pressure plate to disengage the clutch. Who is right?
A. A only
B. B only
C. Both A and B
D. Neither A nor B

2. All of the following are true about removing a differential assembly EXCEPT:
A. the axle shafts must be removed.
B. the bearing caps should be marked to the housing.
C. the bearing races and shim pack should not be mixed up.
D. the pinion gear always stays in the axle housing.

3. Which of the following is the best way to check component wear when assembling a transfer case?
A. Prelube the components
B. Clean components thoroughly
C. Clean all sealing surfaces
D. Measure clearances

4. The ignition module uses the digital signal received from the PCM for:
A. rpm input.
B. Hall effect timing.
C. #1 cylinder signal.
D. Computed timing signal.

5. While testing a vehicle for no-start, Technician A says that since there is battery voltage at the electric fuel pump connector with no fuel pump operation it must be a bad fuel pump. Technician B disagrees stating that a voltage drop check should be made at the fuel pump connector before the fuel pump is replaced. Who is right?
A. Technician A only
B. B only
C. Both A and B
D. Neither A nor B

6. A 12-volt battery has just failed a capacity test and is being charged at 40 amps. After three minutes of charge, with the charger still operating, a voltmeter is hooked up across the battery and reads 15 .8 volts. What does this indicate?
A. The battery should be slow charged and put back into service.
B. The battery’s electrolyte should be replaced.
C. The battery is sulfated and should be replaced.
D. This is normal; continue fast charge and return to service.




7. During a stall test, the stall speed is above specifications. Technician A says the exhaust system may be restricted. Technician B says the engine may have low compression. Who is right?
A. A only
B. B only
C. Both A and B
D. Neither A nor B

8. A customer explain that, “Intermittently the MIL will come on, and transmission will only have one forward speed.” Sometimes after the ignition is cycled the transmission functions normally until the same scenario reappears. While pressure testing, pressure in all ranges are found to be high. Technician A says the problem could be intermittent loss of electrical power to the transmission. Technician B says out-of-range turbine-to-output shaft speed sensor ratio during a shift could be the cause. Who is right?
A. A only
B. B only
C. Both A and B
D. Neither A nor B

9. During a main line pressure test, the pressure gradually decreases at higher engine speeds. The MOST likely cause of this problem could be:
A. a worn oil pump
B. a restricted oil filter.
C. a stuck pressure regulator.
D. a plugged modulator hose.

10. The headlights on a vehicle go out intermittently and come back on in a few minutes. Technician A says this problem may be caused by an intermittent short to ground. Technician B says this problem may be caused by high charging system voltage. Who is correct?
A. A only
B. B only
C. Both A and B
D. Neither A nor B

11. With the ignition switch off, the ohmmeter leads are connected from the starter solenoid S terminal to the solenoid case. The ohmmeter provides an infinite reading. The cause of this reading could be:
A. the solenoid pull-in winding is grounded.
B. the solenoid hold-in winding is open.
C. the solenoid pull-in winding is shorted.
D. the solenoid hold-in winding is shorted.

12. While diagnosing the cause of a blown fuse in the blower motor circuit, Technician A says a short in the blower motor circuit could cause the fuse to blow. Technician B says an open field winding in the blower motor could have caused the fuse to blow. Who is right?
A. A only
B. B only
C. Both A and B
D. Neither A nor B
13. A technician finds that an air-conditioning system has excessive high-side pressure. The low-side pressure is normal to high. A probable cause of this problem cause of this problem is:
A. the condenser air passages are restricted.
B. a leaking thermostatic expansion valve.
C. an open bypass valve.
D. a malfunctioning vapor control switch.

14. Technician A says that excessive steering wheel play can be caused by worn tie-rod ball sockets. Technician B says that steering wheel play can be caused by a worn idler arm. Who is right?
A. A only
B. B only
C. Both A and B
D. Neither A nor B

15. The thrust angle on a front-wheel drive vehicle is more than specified, and the thrust line is positioned to the left of the geometric centerline. This problem could be caused by:
A. Excessive toe-out on the left rear wheel.
B. Excessive toe-out on the right rear wheel.
C. Excessive positive camber on the left rear wheel.
D. Excessive wear in the left rear lower ball joint.

16. A voltage-drop test is performed on the fuel pump circuit. Technician A says a low-voltage drop across the fuel pump indicates that the fuel pump is serviceable. Technician B says that a high-voltage drop across the fuel pump relay switch indicates that the switch is serviceable. Who is right?
A. Technician A only
B. Technician B only
C. Both A and B
D. Neither A nor B

17. Engine Coolant Temperature integrity is being discussed. Technician A says the ECT readings can be compared with the IAT readings after the vehicle has set for at least eight hours. Technician B says the ECT should set a fault code if it is faulty. Who is correct?
A. A only
B. B only
C. Both A and B
D. Neither A nor B

18. During a cylinder leakage test, the engine is found to have 90 percent leakage on two cylinders next to one another. Neither cylinder will stay at top dead-center during the test. Which of these is the Most-Likely cause?
A. Burned exhaust valves on both cylinders
B. Holes in the top of the pistons
C. A damaged head gasket
D. A collapsed lifter or lash adjusters both cylinders




19. A loud thumping noise is present during all engine speeds. If the oil pressure is normal, which of these would MOST likely be the cause?
A. Worn pistons and cylinders
B. Loose flywheel bolts
C. Worn main bearings
D. Loose camshaft bearings

20. Undercar Specialist A says an oxygen sensor can be a voltage-producing sensor. Undercar Specialist B says an oxygen sensor is a thermistor sensor. Who is right?
A. A only
B. Specialist B only
C. Both A and B
D. Neither A or B

21. Undercar Specialist A says if vacuum is applied to a positive back pressure EGR valve when the engine is off, a good valve will open. Undercar Specialist B says if vacuum is applied to a negative back pressure EGR valve when the engine is off, a good valve will open. Who is right?

A. A only
B. Specialist B only
C. Both A and B
D. Neither A or B

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

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      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
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