Quantcast
Jump to content


Social Media while on the job


Recommended Posts

Does anyone have in their manual a statement on not using social media while on the job? And if so the consequences?

It's one thing to promote the business on their own time, it's another to have random posting of their tattoo's etc during work hours.

My concern is being under a $100 car or a $100,000. RV and not paying attention to the oil plug etc. We state no Cell Phones, but since we are absentee owners - and my manager is multi-tasking and can't babysit-- I am the one that see's the posts.

He tried to block me, silly boy- I know people that know him and have access to seeing his fb posts.

Suggestions? TIA

Link to comment
Share on other sites



  • 2 weeks later...

If he good employee besides that, give him a chance, but get it in writing. If he hasn't personally cause any issues with customer's cars yet, pull him aside and give him an talking too. Tell him that if you ever catch him again - he is gone. No excuses!

Link to comment
Share on other sites

wow people multi task all the time. whats the problem? your going to fire a technician over sm? wow

No, he is going to fire him for not doing what he was told to do... Period, end of story. You write the pay checks at the end of the, you tell the employees what to do. If they don't listen, they have to leave.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sure glad I have never worked for a baby sitter like you. I'm sure you have people shacking in there boots and wondering if they will get fired every time they turn around. Thank god we have therapist for people like you. Take care and don't forget your pills.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sure glad I have never worked for a baby sitter like you. I'm sure you have people shacking in there boots and wondering if they will get fired every time they turn around. Thank god we have therapist for people like you. Take care and don't forget your pills.

No need to be rude. I'm simply trying to explain what I said.

 

I for one, don't mind if my employees use social media while at work (as long as it doesn't interfere with their performance). In fact, I don't mind if they get on Facebook using the company computers. However, if I asked them not to do it anymore and they ignored me, I would have no other choice.

 

See, if they ignore your rule about social media and there are no consequences, why would they follow any of your other rules like showing up on time or taking lunch when they are supposed to. I'm not saying to fire someone the second they break a rule, but if you have verbally warned and provided a written warning, maybe it's time to send them home for 1-3 days without pay. If they still refuse, then you don't have much of a choice left.

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 3 weeks later...

Lets not forget what is expected of our techs when they are at work. WORK!!! Not play time.. You do need to make sure they know what is expected of them, and what is policy. Once that policy is set, we are all adults and should be able to fallow said policies...

  • Like 2
Link to comment
Share on other sites

  • 2 weeks later...

Even when I was on vacation and I might chat with the manager at a restaurant, hotel, shop etc and the most common statement was "I CAN'T FIND ANYONE THAT WILL WORK WITHOUT BEING CONNECTED"

 

We live in a digital world where employees are in cyberspace or thinking about being in cyberspace. They would hate to miss a good sexting.

Edited by FROGFINDER
Link to comment
Share on other sites

It is a lot about performance. If a tech is turning the hours that you require, than it shouldn't matter. For that reason, you wouldn't mine if he was on SM. I do agree though when it's time to work, SM is shut off! If you don't listen there will be consequences.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Wouldn't a production based pay structure reduce this to a negligible point?
If your techs know that they are getting paid based on efficiency vs a labour guide, they'd be far less likely to be on their phones wasting time?

 

I'd rather have a pay structure in place that penalizes someone for wasting time, rather then being "big brother" and criticizing everyone who pulls their phone out of their pocket.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think even if you pay flat rate there should be a policy in place for limiting cell phone use. Its not about baby sitting, if your tech gets distracted and forgetting something causes an accident or let's say a drain plug that's left loose causes a seized engine WHO IS PAYING FOR IT ? You as an owner or the tech that says "sorry I was distracted, I'll take care of it"? If the liability was on the tech for "sh*t happens" then yes, use your phone and I will pay you flat rate BUT if the liability is on ME as a shop owner YOU will follow policies or you are out.

I am not saying fire somebody for touching the cell phone but if it's a habit and it doesn't stop after "the talk" he needs to go.

And if somebody tells me that they can "multi-task" and not get distracted then I wouldn't even try to argue with them, it's a lost cause and they are not being honest with me or themselves. In either case its a waste of time arguing with that person and it's time to let them go.

  • Like 1
Link to comment
Share on other sites

I think even if you pay flat rate there should be a policy in place for limiting cell phone use. Its not about baby sitting, if your tech gets distracted and forgetting something causes an accident or let's say a drain plug that's left loose causes a seized engine WHO IS PAYING FOR IT ? You as an owner or the tech that says "sorry I was distracted, I'll take care of it"? If the liability was on the tech for "sh*t happens" then yes, use your phone and I will pay you flat rate BUT if the liability is on ME as a shop owner YOU will follow policies or you are out.

I am not saying fire somebody for touching the cell phone but if it's a habit and it doesn't stop after "the talk" he needs to go.

And if somebody tells me that they can "multi-task" and not get distracted then I wouldn't even try to argue with them, it's a lost cause and they are not being honest with me or themselves. In either case its a waste of time arguing with that person and it's time to let them go.

 

That is a fair assumption.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
  • Available Subscriptions

  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
  • Similar Topics

    • By Joe Marconi

      Premium Member Content 

      This content is hidden to guests, one of the benefits of a paid membership. Please login or register to view this content.

    • By Joe Marconi

      Premium Member Content 

      This content is hidden to guests, one of the benefits of a paid membership. Please login or register to view this content.

    • By carmcapriotto
      Thanks to our partners, NAPA TRACS and Promotive
      In this episode of Business by the Numbers, Hunt explores the benefits and considerations of owning your auto shop's real estate. Learn about financing options, affordability, and real-life examples to help you make an informed decision.
      -Understand different financing options for purchasing real estate.
      -Assess your shop's ability to afford property ownership.
      -Learn the long-term benefits of owning your business premises.
      -Real-life examples to illustrate key points.
      
      Thanks to our partners, NAPA TRACS and Promotive
      Did you know that NAPA TRACS has onsite training plus six days a week support?
      It all starts when a local representative meets with you to learn about your business and how you run it.  After all, it's your shop, so it's your choice.
      Let us prove to you that Tracs is the single best shop management system in the business.  Find NAPA TRACS on the Web at NAPATRACS.com
      Paar Melis and Associates – Accountants Specializing in Automotive Repair
      Visit us Online: www.paarmelis.com
      Email Hunt: [email protected]
      Get a copy of my Book: Download Here
      Aftermarket Radio Network
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By carmcapriotto
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA Autotech
      Matt Fanslow reflects on the profound influence of his mentor, Jim Wilson. He discusses Jim's unique diagnostic approach and the importance of networking and continuous learning from industry stalwarts.
      Show Notes
      The influence of mentorship (00:00:11)  Learning from case studies (00:02:35)  Diagnostic techniques (00:05:00)  Understanding DTCs (00:07:39)  Diagnostic strategies (00:12:10)  Networking and mentorship (00:17:53)  Facebook Groups (00:18:53)  Learning from Archives and Mentors (00:22:25)   
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA Autotech napaautotech.com
       
      Email Matt: [email protected]
      Diagnosing the Aftermarket A - Z YouTube Channel HERE
      Aftermarket Radio Network: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com/
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By Changing The Industry
      Episode 172 - AI Integration & Social Media Impact In Auto Repair With Andrew Fischer


  • Our Sponsors



×
×
  • Create New...