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Ive been having Saturday hours from 9-2 since I opened 4 years ago. Its never been a great day, every once in a while im busy but mostly its small stuff and not really worth staying open. Does anyone do Saturdays by appointment only and if so how does it work out for you? Im not opposed to working on sat. just want to make it worthwhile. and also have the option of having 2 days off if I want.

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