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Joe Marconi

CustomerLink, share comments?

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Have any shop owners had experience with CustomerLink. I viewed a demo today and I was impressed with their strategy, particularly how they analyze your data base, ID your ideal customers and also target market and advertise to find more of your ideal customers. Also liked the reports.

 

Any info on CustomerLink is appreciated, Thanks in advance!

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      It’s not what they say, it’s what they said.
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