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Focus on People, not Numbers

Legendary UCLA Basket Coach, John Wooden, never focused on the score of a game. John Wooden believed that success is achieved by paying attention to the details of the game, not concentrating on the score. He also knew that well-trained players, executing a plan and paying attention to personal performance and team work, will ultimately lead to success. Under his leadership, the UCLA Bruins holds the record with 11 Division 1 NCAA Championships, 10 national titles in 12 seasons, including 7 straight wins from 1967 to 1973. His strategy, a focus on people and team spirit, brings out the very best someone has to offer to the team. His record is a testament to his strategy.

 

As business owners, we often get caught up in the numbers of the business. I am not suggesting the numbers are not important. Shop owners need to understand all the financial aspects of business. But a business, just like any team, will reach high levels of success if the organization has the right people in place, that pays attention to all the details, and are in an environment where the focus is on team spirit and achieving the personal best of each individual.

 

With this strategy, the numbers, the score, will take care of itself.

 

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    • By Joe Marconi
      I will never forget the day I met Carlos. It was 13 years ago at a small business conference in New York City. The conference drew business owners from all types of industries throughout the greater New York area. Carlos was sitting next to me at orientation. The day was lined up with guest speakers, workshops and networking opportunities. By the third networking break, Carlos and I were hitting it off. We traded war stories, discussed business challenges and brainstormed new ideas. Carlos owns two Italian restaurants, one in Manhattan and the other in Brooklyn. His first restaurant was founded in 1986 when he was 27 years old. I finally asked Carlos, “What’s your background? Did you go school to become a chef? Did your family own a restaurant? Do you enjoy cooking?” Carlos turned to me, smiled, and said, “Joe, I am going to let you in on a little-known secret: I have never cooked a meal in my life.”
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      This story was originally published by Joe Marconi in Ratchet+Wrench on November 1st, 2018


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    • By Joe Marconi
      We allow visitors to read the first post of each topic. To continue reading responses, you must be signed in.
    • By Joe Marconi
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      There are endless issues and problems you encounter each and every day, and some of those problems are out of your control. But, excluding a cataclysmic event, you can trace most of your problems back to you. You are the shop owner, you are the leader. The strength of your business begins and ends with you. Given two equally talented ball teams, the difference between winning and losing is usually leadership.
      Employees need to know you care about them. The people you employ have vision and goals, too. Not the same as yours, but real nonetheless. One of your jobs, as leader, is to align their goals with yours.
      We throw this leadership term around a lot these days, and for good reason. It’s the most powerful skill you have in terms of getting the results for which you are looking. The horrible truth is there are too many bosses and not enough leaders. Anyone can be a boss. Bosses order people around. And people will follow, but not for the long term. A leader motivates others by understanding what drives the individual. A leader gives credit to others, never seeking gain at the expense of others.
      Next time you walk through your shop, pay attention to the mood of your employees. Are your employees laughing and talking to each other? You know, having a little fun at work. Do your employees look to engage in conversation with you, or are their heads buried under the hood of a car as you pass them by? Even worse, does everyone stop talking when you are around? These are signs that your employees are not engaged, which means they are not aligned with the goals and vision of the business, and you are not aligned with theirs.
      A leader finds out what’s important to others, and works to help them achieve it. Aligning the goals of the individual with the goals of the company will achieve great things. When employees are respected as people, they become motivated and perform at their best; not because they are told to, but because they want to. This is the highest form of team spirit and becomes your driving force toward success.
      This story was originally published by Joe Marconi in Ratchet+Wrench on October 1st, 2018


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