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Joe Marconi

Hire right, train right, then get out the way

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Hire right, train right, then get out the way

 

In his book, Good to Great, Jim Collins discusses the attributes of what makes a company not just good, but great. One of those attributes is finding the right people. Here’s a quote from the book. They (a company) start by getting the right people on the bus, the wrong people off the bus, and the right people in the right seats.”

 

I learned the hard way that having the wrong people can severely hurt the business. To be successful, we need to hire the right people, train those people and then get out of their way and let them do their job.

 

Ask yourself: Do you have the right people? If you don’t, you need to make changes. If you do, make sure you do all you can to train and empower these people to perform at their best.

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