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Joe Marconi

ASE: Still Not Recognized By The Public?

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One of more common complaints about ASE Certification is that the public has little idea what it means or what it stands for. For the most part that’s true. I have been ASE Certified since the mid-1970s. My wife has seen my study for the tests, has seen me go take the tests, knows that our company and ASO endorses and promote ASE certifications. She also knows that my shop is a Blue Seal Shop. But when asked; “What exactly is ASE?” She gives me that blank stare.

 

My wife along with countless others may not know exactly what ASE stands for, but they do know it stands for something of value. I remember waiting in my lawyer’s office and on the wall was an award given to my lawyer form a law organization. For the life if me I cannot remember the organization, nor do I remember the name of the organization. But, I do remember thinking it was a positive thing.

 

How do you feel about ASE and does it matter that your customers may not know what it stands for. And, should we be doing more to promote ASE within our own shops?

 

 

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