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2010 How was it for you?


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We ended up with a 7% increase, a little lower than I would like. Our car counts were very strong, higher than last year. That bothers me a bit. I always view car counts as opportunity. Half way thru the year, I wondered if our car counts were too high, but with economic conditions the way they are, and tough competition these days, the last thing I want to do is refuse a customer, especially a new customer.

 

We have many new programs to put into place and big goals for this year. I know where I need to improve and I may have to make a few changes with regard to staffing.

I think as an industry, we are on the brink of gaining momentum in a very positive direction. Those businesses that retreated during the "great recession" will have a tough time and will be chasing the market. Those that remained on course will do much better.

 

I want to wish all my friends at ASO the very best and much good fortune. Within the forums I have come to respect each and every one of you. As a group, we are strong...and the strong will not just survive...but thrive!

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2010, wasn't a banner year in some respects. But it was a good one. 2011 looks even better. I may write a few more columns and I might do some more trade show apperances... but one thing will never change... I'm a damned good mechanic... that's where I'm most comfortable... despite what the general publics attitude towards this trade... I wouldn't trade my years under a hood for anything. That's where I'll be... till I can't do it anymore.

To all my ASO buddies... "Keep it between the ditches... and off the tow trucks!"

 

2010 is behind us and 2011 looms ahead. How was your year? What changes will you be making in thee coming year? I personally am working on some changes in the hopes of VASTLY improving from a 2010 standpoint.

After the "meltdown" and return to business in July I was supported and encouraged by everyone here at ASO. Thank You and I am looking forward to hearing whats in store for 2011. HAPPY NEW YEAR and GOD BLESS!!

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Yea, I remember old Jerry... he had some great stories... (one of my favorites was about the pig and the wheel barrow...LOL)

Thanx for your thoughts... Only time will tell... I'd like to think I would make a great trade show draw... you know, telling some of my stories with my usual flare. At least I'd know I'd have one audience memebr... LOL

 

Have a great year ! ! Gonzo

 

You also have potential to be a good humorous author and personality. Work on it and you can be the "Jerry Clower" of the automotive business. You do remember Jerry Clower don't you?

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We ended up just with just under 40% total sales increase for the year. This is with the addition of a new location. Same store sales were up around 20%.

 

We are starting a major advertising campaign in 2011. We have done little to no advertising in our first three years so this is uncharted territory. We started with a new website, setireco.com. We are also looking into some direct mail programs and also internet and social networking programs. We have had good response through Facebook in the past and are really looking to build on that.

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