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The Quality of Your Work May Not be Enough


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Studies have shown that for every customer lost due to a major blunder, hundreds more are lost due to inferior customer service, apathy, and indifference. While we cannot be expected to please everyone and cannot be everything to everyone, there are many subtle events that occur during the course of each day that might be sending your customers down the road, never to return again.

 

Shop owners routinely focus on the quality of the repairs and services performed. They take great pride in their work and the work of their employees. But, that may not be enough. Let me give you an example of what can go wrong, that can alienate your customers.

 

Mrs. Jones arrives at your service counter at 8:00am for her scheduled 30k service. She also asks your service advisor to install a new set of wipers and requests that the car be ready by 3:00 so she can make her dentist appointment. Your service advisor neglects to note on the work order, the wipers, and the request to have the car completed by 3:00. Because this job is viewed as routine service, the car is scheduled for the afternoon. Mrs. Jones calls at 1:00 only to find that her car has not yet been started on. At this point she’s upset and frustrated. You rush to get the car done, but it’s not ready until 3:30. A disappointed Mrs. Jones picks up the car and as it starts to rain on her way to the dentist, realizes that the wipers were not replaced either. She considers turning around and going back to your shop, but decides not to, and makes a promise to herself to find another repair shop.

 

Don’t think this is real life? Think again! Have you ever been at a restaurant where the food was great but the service so horrible that it ruined your night? As you sit there and finish your meal, you vow never to come back. And when the server or host asks if everything was ok, you respond…”just fine”. The truth is everything was not ok and you will probably never return to that restaurant.

 

Most people will not tell you when they are upset with you. Consider yourself lucky whenever a customer comes back to you angry. At least you’ll have a chance to make things right. In today’s tough economic climate, you cannot afford to loose customers.

 

The best repair means nothing if the customer experience is not first-rate. Like it or not, your customers judge you more on the quality of your customer service and the appearance of your shop, than by the quality of the work you do.

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  • 2 years later...

 

The best repair means nothing if the customer experience is not first-rate. Like it or not, your customers judge you more on the quality of your customer service and the appearance of your shop, than by the quality of the work you do.

 

 

this is oh so true, i loose a few hours everyday making sure the customer is happy with the service he is getting, and making sure that i explain everything that was done on the car, and why it was done, yes i loose on the hours but i do retain all my customers.

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I would have to agree with you about the explaining part and keeping the customer happy. It's still a service industry, and service is the key. The only thing that I get a little bent about is after I start on a job (or at the time they are paying for the job) they want to bring up something about how they called someone else and they could do the same job cheaper. Sorry ... that's where I draw the line. I didn't go into the resturaunt and have a meal and then tell them I could find the same thing down the street for less money.

 

Over the years this has been the MAJOR issue I've had with customers. I probably lose more over price than anything else. The usual scenario is I won't see them for a year or two and then they show back up. Been that way for years.

 

customer's don't care that you spent "X" amount on training, equipment, and man power.... "Just fix my car cheap" is the usual answer.

Sorry, not at my shop. Head down the road to one of those "bottom feeder" shops and have them take a crack at it.

 

 

this is oh so true, i loose a few hours everyday making sure the customer is happy with the service he is getting, and making sure that i explain everything that was done on the car, and why it was done, yes i loose on the hours but i do retain all my customers.

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The best repair means nothing if the customer experience is not first-rate. Like it or not, your customers judge you more on the quality of your customer service and the appearance of your shop, than by the quality of the work you do.

the average customer does not know that we took a few extra minutes cleaning the parts on a repair job. They don't know that during a simple oil change we walked around and checked underneath for leaks, worn suspension parts etc while the oil was draining. And they don't the time and effort that may have gone into accurately diagnosing there check engine light because the machine we plug in does that for us. Communication is every thing. Knowing our customers and letting them get to know us. No matter how busy it may be at a particular moment when someone comes in to pick up or drop off taking the time necessary to establish what the customers expectations are and communicating whether or not we will be able to meet those expectations when they drop off along with being able to answer any questions and giving them an overview of what was done during the repair process goes a long ways.

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the average customer does not know that we took a few extra minutes cleaning the parts on a repair job. They don't know that during a simple oil change we walked around and checked underneath for leaks, worn suspension parts etc while the oil was draining. And they don't the time and effort that may have gone into accurately diagnosing there check engine light because the machine we plug in does that for us. Communication is every thing. Knowing our customers and letting them get to know us. No matter how busy it may be at a particular moment when someone comes in to pick up or drop off taking the time necessary to establish what the customers expectations are and communicating whether or not we will be able to meet those expectations when they drop off along with being able to answer any questions and giving them an overview of what was done during the repair process goes a long ways.

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The average customer hears BLAH BLAH BLAH $1000.00. The customer call's another shop and hears BLAH BLAH BLAH $800.00. Verdict You are a rip off and they are not coming back.

 

 

Read the story of the Prodigial Customer (i mean son)

For me personally, if I'm speaking and the customer is hearing blah blah blah it means I failed that customer and in doing so I've failed myself as a shop owner. The essential challenge is to know the right way to speak to each customer that walks through that door in such a way that they hear what you are saying and not just the words you are using.

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For me personally, if I'm speaking and the customer is hearing blah blah blah it means I failed that customer and in doing so I've failed myself as a shop owner. The essential challenge is to know the right way to speak to each customer that walks through that door in such a way that they hear what you are saying and not just the words you are using.

 

Sadly Frogfinder is correct, and you are too, just to varying degrees. The average customer is the key here, all they know is the price. In order to elevate them from the average the key is to educate them and make sure they understand. But to many, too many actually in this economy and in general, the only thing that matters is what they know well, and that is price because they don't know anything else to ask. To the average customer all things are equal, except price. Isn't that what the retail giants have drilled into the consumer for decades? When we, the wise, know that to make the Walmart, Kmart, Target, Sam's, Costco price point the manufacturer may cut out a few thread count, extend the stitch length, remove a few pleats in the filter, lower the bag weight from 20#'s to 14#'s (Iams cat food for example), or change the model number slightly so it's not the same as the next guy so you can't compare. The manufacturer's got smart and in order to meet price points they made changes to accommodate the demands of lower prices. But the average consumer doesnot know, and does not care.

 

In today's ever increasingly narcissistic society all the average customer wants is what they want, when they want it and at the CHEAPEST price they can get, in part because that is what the retail giants have told they want and have done a very good job at convincing them of such. And nothing you can do or say will change that. The people you succeed with are the ones who want your knowledge, skill and expertise. It's akin to the leading a horse to water. You can talk until you lose your voice, but if the consumer/customer/client does not care or want to hear what you have to say, it doesn't matter. I am not saying compete on price, absolutely not. But do not kid yourself, "If I'm speaking and the customer is hearing blah blah blah it means I failed that customer" used to be true, just like it used to be true that the quality of your work was the most important thing. Just like it used to be true that I was young, thin, good looking and had a full head of hair. But things change. Today's average customer/consumer/client is too self-absorbed to care what you have to say beyond what they want to hear. Remember the key was "The average customer." But I still like and follow your thinking while trying hard to evolve to accommodate the new reality of the average customer.

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Ever since I started working (in customer service jobs especially) I have always subscribed to the notion that there were three factors to every consumer's choice, in order of importance

1) Customer Service

2) Quality

3) Price.

 

Sadly that is not true any longer. I always thought that if a customer was treated really well they would accept slightly lower quality and a slightly higher price. The balance was very precarious but that was the order I believed was important to the consumer. But the more I do this as a shop owner the less I think quality and customer service are appreciated. They are expected, just not valued, and are disproportionately balanced with price. The average consumer expects 5 star service, Rolls-Royce quality at a Yugo price, and they think they are totally reasonable to expect it. And I think the average consumer is so wrapped up in themselves and their twit(ter) followers and farcebook "friends" that they think they are the only thing that matters in life so they are entitled to what they want and you are obligated to give it to them. And that is without regard to how they treat others. So great customer service is unappreciated and unrewarded, it is expected, even though it is often not delivered. And regardless of whether or not you discuss the quality and expected lifespan of a repair, in the customer's mind they paid for it once, and they should never have to have it fixed again. Even when they come in, "OH man I'm selling this thing, can you fix it any cheaper?" You lose your mind for the afternoon, put on that cheaper than El Cheapo part and 17 months later they are still driving the car they were going to sell and when the part fails all you hear is "But you just replaced that!" You can look at this from several different view points, you provided the customer service that was expected, you fixed the car they told you they were going to sell. You served their expressed need for a cheap fix, after all what you put on was better than what you took off, right? And all they wanted was to get it to where they could sell it. But they played you. They didn't care about you, about quality, or about their relationship with you. All they cared about was themselves and what they wanted, a cheap fix. So nothing really matters anymore to the average consumer except for themselves, and price.

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I TOTALLY AGREE! Anybody out there that thinks they can talk EVERY customer into contributing to their business is a FOOL. You're not going to get along with everybody... you're not going to have the price that everyone can agree on. If IT was true, and you could please everyone every time... what the hell would the rest of the shops in town be repairing? You'd be the only one in business because you're SO perfect.

 

Yea, sure, right...you're going to retain every customer that comes thru the door... and if you couldn't tell... I'm not one of those people you can please every time.... LOL Since I've been there, seen it, done it, bought the T shirt... and ... yea... I really did write the book about it. LOL

People are people... you can try to please them all, I already know it's NOT possible... more than likely all you're going to get for all your efforts are gray hairs and a prescription for prosaic.

 

And you're right about the Blah, Blah part... some people only care about the price, not who does the work..........................................................

 

 

 

 

re not coming back.

 

 

Read the story of the Prodigial Customer (i mean son)

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Sadly Frogfinder is correct, and you are too, just to varying degrees. The average customer is the key here, all they know is the price. In order to elevate them from the average the key is to educate them and make sure they understand. But to many, too many actually in this economy and in general, the only thing that matters is what they know well, and that is price because they don't know anything else to ask. To the average customer all things are equal, except price. Isn't that what the retail giants have drilled into the consumer for decades? When we, the wise, know that to make the Walmart, Kmart, Target, Sam's, Costco price point the manufacturer may cut out a few thread count, extend the stitch length, remove a few pleats in the filter, lower the bag weight from 20#'s to 14#'s (Iams cat food for example), or change the model number slightly so it's not the same as the next guy so you can't compare. The manufacturer's got smart and in order to meet price points they made changes to accommodate the demands of lower prices. But the average consumer doesnot know, and does not care.

 

In today's ever increasingly narcissistic society all the average customer wants is what they want, when they want it and at the CHEAPEST price they can get, in part because that is what the retail giants have told they want and have done a very good job at convincing them of such. And nothing you can do or say will change that. The people you succeed with are the ones who want your knowledge, skill and expertise. It's akin to the leading a horse to water. You can talk until you lose your voice, but if the consumer/customer/client does not care or want to hear what you have to say, it doesn't matter. I am not saying compete on price, absolutely not. But do not kid yourself, "If I'm speaking and the customer is hearing blah blah blah it means I failed that customer" used to be true, just like it used to be true that the quality of your work was the most important thing. Just like it used to be true that I was young, thin, good looking and had a full head of hair. But things change. Today's average customer/consumer/client is too self-absorbed to care what you have to say beyond what they want to hear. Remember the key was "The average customer." But I still like and follow your thinking while trying hard to evolve to accommodate the new reality of the average customer.

I hear what your saying, it goes back to my statement in an earlier post about finding out what the customers expectations are to see if those expectations are able to be met. If they are to hung up on price and little else I don't waste all that much time trying to educate. I'm less then 3 years in business and still learning and tweaking how I do things but what does stick in my mind from the feedback I have heard from customers is they like that I explain things to them.

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HOWDY,

My take on the average customer was a borrowed parable from Homer Simson. Bart was talking to his dog and all the dog heard was "BLAH BLAH BLAH SPOT BLAH ........................ :rolleyes:

 

That being said I say Focus on what you do/love best and become so good at doing that people will pay you very well not to stop doing what you love doing. Twenty percent of your customers provide eighty percent of your revenue. Every customer can refer you a $500.00 job if you will will ask them to. Offer every customer a cold drink , a courtesy ride and extra business cards. B)

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Wow, what a discussion…please hear my take on this…

 

People focus on price because we are a price-driven industry, and like it or not much of what we sell has been reduced to the status of a commodity. Every week at the supermarket we price milk, eggs, orange juice and Pepsi. When we need gas for our cars the first thing we do is look at the price, right?? Well, it’s the same with auto repair. I hate to tell you this, but it’s our own fault, not the public.

 

How many of you ride a Harley Davidson? Would you ever consider another bike? Were you inconvenienced by the wait the last time you ordered your bike? Does Harley produce the cheapest motorcycles? No. It’s debatable that it produces the best machine, nor is a Harley dealership considered the “friendly service” in town. But the fact is no one cares about the price or service….as a matter of fact many will tattoo the Harley logo on their arm!

 

Let me go step further, people who DO NOT ride a Harley, who have even never been on a motorcycle, will wear Harley Davidson clothes. The market of non-motorcycle riders who purchase Harley Davidson clothes and other apparrel represents 12% of Harley Davidson gross sales!!! Again, price never enters into the picture.

 

I don’t know how to do it, but we must move away from price. This “price” thing bothers me as much as anyone. I know one thing that no one can refute: If we sell our company brand like a supermarket sells a dozen eggs or milk, we are in trouble. In other words, if we identify our business by the parts and services we sell, then the consumer will judge you by what you sell. Price becomes the only determining factor, because YOU told him that.

 

I have been thinking for a while to position my shop in a different light. I am re-branding my culture and targeting consumers who want my type of culture, those people who don’t want the status quo. People who will allow me to take care of their car and family because they believe in me and my people, just like a family or friend.

 

When and if I figure it out I will let you know…

B) Birds (customers) of a feather flock together.

:rolleyes:

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Wow, what a discussion…please hear my take on this…

 

People focus on price because we are a price-driven industry, and like it or not much of what we sell has been reduced to the status of a commodity. Every week at the supermarket we price milk, eggs, orange juice and Pepsi. When we need gas for our cars the first thing we do is look at the price, right?? Well, it’s the same with auto repair. I hate to tell you this, but it’s our own fault, not the public.

 

Agreed, we talk and complain about the bottom feeder shops weekly, about the shops that want to be the cheapest because that will get them lots of business and the think that will make them boatloads of money. We all know that isn't true, it will get them business but not the type that keeps the doors open. Every trade charges what they do for a reason. Why do you think a lawyer charges $250, $500, $2000 an hour? Because that is what they need to charge to pay for the law books, research staff and a good living. They get it because they all charge it. That and they all have to meet a certain standard for their profession, a little thing called the Bar exam. Likewise plumbers get to charge what they do, because they all charge similar amounts and I assume that like electricians they must apprentice and journey and finally "graduate" to a certain status by law, statute or ordinance. But we allow these cut rate shops to operate because we as an industry do not require higher standards of ourselves. Why do we allow this, because heaven forbid that if we were required to meet minimum standards there would have to be a governing body, maybe even (gasp) The Government to oversee and enforce those minimum standards. But we as an industry have no interest in establishing those minimum standards and the trade organizations that supposedly foster improved professionalism, integrity, and certify competence really are all voluntary organizations that do little to advance our profession beyond those of us who voluntarily adhere. But those cut-rate shops, do you think they adhere? No, that's part of how they can charge less. So yes Joe, you are right, it's our fault that our profession is not held in higher esteem. It's our fault because we are not willing to impose minimum standards on our profession that would earn us the esteem we want and many of us deserve.

 

 

How many of you ride a Harley Davidson? Would you ever consider another bike? Were you inconvenienced by the wait the last time you ordered your bike? Does Harley produce the cheapest motorcycles? No. It’s debatable that it produces the best machine, nor is a Harley dealership considered the “friendly service” in town. But the fact is no one cares about the price or service….as a matter of fact many will tattoo the Harley logo on their arm!

 

Let me go step further, people who DO NOT ride a Harley, who have even never been on a motorcycle, will wear Harley Davidson clothes. The market of non-motorcycle riders who purchase Harley Davidson clothes and other apparrel represents 12% of Harley Davidson gross sales!!! Again, price never enters into the picture.

 

Rebels without a clue. A truly phenomenal marketing feat that is for sure. But like crapple products, it's what's "cool" not what's intelligent, smart, reasonable or prudent. But it would be nice to sprinkle some of that pixie dust on our profession and elevate the image, and value.

 

I don’t know how to do it, but we must move away from price. This “price” thing bothers me as much as anyone. I know one thing that no one can refute: If we sell our company brand like a supermarket sells a dozen eggs or milk, we are in trouble. In other words, if we identify our business by the parts and services we sell, then the consumer will judge you by what you sell. Price becomes the only determining factor, because YOU told him that.

 

But what else are we supposed to sell the customer? They have a need for the coolant leak on their car to be fixed, or the grinding brakes to be replaced. What else are we supposed to sell them? How else are we supposed to sell them? I think part of the problem is education. So many people simply know to turn the key and if it starts, DRIVE IT! They don't know that the premium brake pads will stop stronger, shorter, and more reliably than the $19.95 brake pad in the $99.00 brake job. All they know it that 99.9% of the time they step on the brake pedal and the car stops. It's that .1% of the time that the 10 foot shorter stopping distance will be the difference between driving away, heart pounding and riding away in an ambulance. I used to try to sell my brake jobs with premium parts that way, most people stopped listening after premium, in their minds premium simply equaled more $$$, nothing else, not better quality, better performance, more safety, just more money. I helped a guy tie down a heavy load in his pick-up one day and told him to place the load as far forward as possible because he could control how fast he had to accelerate but he couldn't control how fast he may have to stop. He gave me this deer-in-the-headlight look like I was crazy. But the next time I talked to him he thanked me for insisting he do that, because he had a kid blow a stop sign and he had to slam on the brakes and heard the load tilt forward and tap the front of the truck bed. If it had been all the way to the back like he wanted for easier unloading he would have at least broken the rear window in the cab as the load broke free and slid forward. He finally got it, but if he hadn't had that pseudo-emergency, just like the other 99.9% of the time, I would still be crazy for wanting him to work harder to load and unload his cargo.

 

So maybe it isn't entirely our fault that our profession is regarded as the physical work we perform, not the experience, care and concern we have for our customer's and their family's well-being manifested in a job well done with high-quality parts and top-notch labor that will provide a long term solution to their need for reliable vehicles.

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

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      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
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    • By carmcapriotto
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA Auto Care "As shop owners and management, we want to be productive, we want to follow key metrics, we all need to be in business. We all got to meet our goals, our personal goals as shop owners and management. But at the end of the day, if you're not looking for moments of stress happening in your organization and what you can do from a resource point of view, that's what I see." Frank Leutz emphasizes a customer-centric approach, highlighting the value of simplicity, positive employee work culture, and community involvement. Frank Leutz, Desert Car Car, WrenchNationTV. Frank's previous episodes HERE Show Notes
      The Brakes for Breasts Initiative (00:00:15) An initiative by two shop owners to raise funds for a vaccine for triple negative breast cancer. https://brakesforbreasts.com Early Days of Desert Car Care (00:01:49) Frank Leutz discusses the history and relocation of Desert Car Care in Cave Creek, Arizona. Wrench Nation (00:02:49) Frank Leutz talks about the origins and evolution of Wrench Nation, an automotive lifestyle show. Customer-Centric Service Ideology (00:04:21) Frank Leutz discusses the importance of focusing on making the customer the hero of the service experience. Simplicity in Decision-Making (00:09:28) The significance of keeping business operations simple and the impact of simplicity on leadership and problem-solving. Managing Cynicism in the Industry (00:15:35) Frank Leutz addresses the issue of cynicism in the automotive industry and the importance of coaching and therapy to overcome it. The ideology of leaving a legacy (00:16:41) Discusses the importance of leaving a legacy within the industry and the impact of one's actions on future generations. The importance of attitude and aptitude (00:19:39) Emphasizes the significance of attitude and aptitude in maintaining a healthy work-life balance and the impact on business and personal life. The concept of "night school" and continuous learning (00:20:32) Discusses the idea of continuous learning, seeking training sessions, and the importance of personal and professional development. Fostering a supportive and community-oriented workplace (00:22:02) Highlights the importance of creating a supportive and community-oriented workplace, including team-building activities and supporting employees in personal challenges. Embracing a people-first approach (00:24:46) Stresses the importance of celebrating and supporting people within the organization, fostering a supportive and inclusive environment. Community involvement and giving back (00:28:13) Emphasizes the role of auto shops in the community, giving back, and supporting local initiatives, such as free oil changes for school teachers. The significance of networking and staying connected (00:31:39) Highlights the power of networking and staying connected with industry peers and mentors for personal and professional growth. Mutual Appreciation (00:36:03) Frank and Carm express mutual admiration for each other's contributions to the industry. Property Ownership (00:36:26) Frank shares his excitement about owning commercial real estate for his business, Desert Car Care.
      Thanks to our Partner, NAPA Auto Care Learn more about NAPA Auto Care and the benefits of being part of the NAPA family by visiting https://www.napaonline.com/en/auto-care Connect with the Podcast: -Follow on Facebook: https://www.facebook.com/RemarkableResultsRadioPodcast/ -Join Our Virtual Toastmasters Club: https://remarkableresults.biz/toastmasters -Join Our Private Facebook Community: https://www.facebook.com/groups/1734687266778976 -Subscribe on YouTube: https://www.youtube.com/carmcapriotto -Follow on LinkedIn: https://www.linkedin.com/in/carmcapriotto/ -Follow on Instagram: https://www.instagram.com/remarkableresultsradiopodcast/ -Follow on Twitter: https://twitter.com/RResultsBiz -Visit the Website: https://remarkableresults.biz/ -Join our Insider List: https://remarkableresults.biz/insider -All books mentioned on our podcasts: https://remarkableresults.biz/books -Our Classroom page for personal or team learning: https://remarkableresults.biz/classroom -Buy Me a Coffee: https://www.buymeacoffee.com/carm -The Aftermarket Radio Network: https://aftermarketradionetwork.com -Special episode collections: https://remarkableresults.biz/collections
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By carmcapriotto
      In this episode of the Auto Repair Marketing Podcast, hosts Brian and Kim Walker are joined by Rena Rennebohm to discuss the crucial role of service advisors in customer retention. Part of a customer retention series, this conversation highlights the importance of tailored, one-on-one service advisor training. Key topics include the shop owner's role in setting expectations, the benefits of a one-to-one advisor-to-technician ratio, and common mistakes in advisor interactions. Rena emphasizes the need for clear communication, empathy, and consistent follow-up to build trust and enhance customer loyalty, ultimately driving better business outcomes.
      Thank you to RepairPal for sponsoring The Auto Repair Marketing Podcast. Learn more about RepairPal at https://repairpal.com/shops
      How To Get In Touch
      Group - Auto Repair Marketing Mastermind
      Website - shopmarketingpros.com 
      Facebook - facebook.com/shopmarketingpros 
      Get the Book - shopmarketingpros.com/book
      Instagram - @shopmarketingpros 
      Questions/Ideas - [email protected]
      Lagniappe (Books, Links, Other Podcasts, etc)
      Rena Rennebohm: [email protected]
      Website: empoweryouradvisor.com
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By carmcapriotto
      In this episode, Brian and Kim kick off a series on retention marketing, focusing on how auto repair shops can utilize Customer Relationship Management (CRM) systems to enhance customer loyalty and communication. 
      They are joined by Greg Rainville from Steer and Chris Enright from Enright Automotive, who share their expertise and experiences.
      Thank you to RepairPal for sponsoring The Auto Repair Marketing Podcast. Learn more about RepairPal at https://repairpal.com/shops
      Gregg Rainville: steercrm.com, [email protected] Chris Enright: EnrightAuto  
      How To Get In Touch
       
      Group - Auto Repair Marketing Mastermind
      Website - shopmarketingpros.com 
      Facebook - facebook.com/shopmarketingpros 
      Get the Book - shopmarketingpros.com/book
      Instagram - @shopmarketingpros 
      Questions/Ideas - [email protected]
      Lagniappe (Books, Links, Other Podcasts, etc)
      https://www.pendo.io/
      https://steercrm.com/ 
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio


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