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Flash Sale + Social Proof


Flash Sale + Social Proof


Flash Sale + Social Proof

The Quality of Your Work May Not be Enough


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Studies have shown that for every customer lost due to a major blunder, hundreds more are lost due to inferior customer service, apathy, and indifference. While we cannot be expected to please everyone and cannot be everything to everyone, there are many subtle events that occur during the course of each day that might be sending your customers down the road, never to return again.

 

Shop owners routinely focus on the quality of the repairs and services performed. They take great pride in their work and the work of their employees. But, that may not be enough. Let me give you an example of what can go wrong, that can alienate your customers.

 

Mrs. Jones arrives at your service counter at 8:00am for her scheduled 30k service. She also asks your service advisor to install a new set of wipers and requests that the car be ready by 3:00 so she can make her dentist appointment. Your service advisor neglects to note on the work order, the wipers, and the request to have the car completed by 3:00. Because this job is viewed as routine service, the car is scheduled for the afternoon. Mrs. Jones calls at 1:00 only to find that her car has not yet been started on. At this point she’s upset and frustrated. You rush to get the car done, but it’s not ready until 3:30. A disappointed Mrs. Jones picks up the car and as it starts to rain on her way to the dentist, realizes that the wipers were not replaced either. She considers turning around and going back to your shop, but decides not to, and makes a promise to herself to find another repair shop.

 

Don’t think this is real life? Think again! Have you ever been at a restaurant where the food was great but the service so horrible that it ruined your night? As you sit there and finish your meal, you vow never to come back. And when the server or host asks if everything was ok, you respond…”just fine”. The truth is everything was not ok and you will probably never return to that restaurant.

 

Most people will not tell you when they are upset with you. Consider yourself lucky whenever a customer comes back to you angry. At least you’ll have a chance to make things right. In today’s tough economic climate, you cannot afford to loose customers.

 

The best repair means nothing if the customer experience is not first-rate. Like it or not, your customers judge you more on the quality of your customer service and the appearance of your shop, than by the quality of the work you do.

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The best repair means nothing if the customer experience is not first-rate. Like it or not, your customers judge you more on the quality of your customer service and the appearance of your shop, than by the quality of the work you do.

 

 

this is oh so true, i loose a few hours everyday making sure the customer is happy with the service he is getting, and making sure that i explain everything that was done on the car, and why it was done, yes i loose on the hours but i do retain all my customers.

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I would have to agree with you about the explaining part and keeping the customer happy. It's still a service industry, and service is the key. The only thing that I get a little bent about is after I start on a job (or at the time they are paying for the job) they want to bring up something about how they called someone else and they could do the same job cheaper. Sorry ... that's where I draw the line. I didn't go into the resturaunt and have a meal and then tell them I could find the same thing down the street for less money.

 

Over the years this has been the MAJOR issue I've had with customers. I probably lose more over price than anything else. The usual scenario is I won't see them for a year or two and then they show back up. Been that way for years.

 

customer's don't care that you spent "X" amount on training, equipment, and man power.... "Just fix my car cheap" is the usual answer.

Sorry, not at my shop. Head down the road to one of those "bottom feeder" shops and have them take a crack at it.

 

 

this is oh so true, i loose a few hours everyday making sure the customer is happy with the service he is getting, and making sure that i explain everything that was done on the car, and why it was done, yes i loose on the hours but i do retain all my customers.

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The best repair means nothing if the customer experience is not first-rate. Like it or not, your customers judge you more on the quality of your customer service and the appearance of your shop, than by the quality of the work you do.

the average customer does not know that we took a few extra minutes cleaning the parts on a repair job. They don't know that during a simple oil change we walked around and checked underneath for leaks, worn suspension parts etc while the oil was draining. And they don't the time and effort that may have gone into accurately diagnosing there check engine light because the machine we plug in does that for us. Communication is every thing. Knowing our customers and letting them get to know us. No matter how busy it may be at a particular moment when someone comes in to pick up or drop off taking the time necessary to establish what the customers expectations are and communicating whether or not we will be able to meet those expectations when they drop off along with being able to answer any questions and giving them an overview of what was done during the repair process goes a long ways.

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the average customer does not know that we took a few extra minutes cleaning the parts on a repair job. They don't know that during a simple oil change we walked around and checked underneath for leaks, worn suspension parts etc while the oil was draining. And they don't the time and effort that may have gone into accurately diagnosing there check engine light because the machine we plug in does that for us. Communication is every thing. Knowing our customers and letting them get to know us. No matter how busy it may be at a particular moment when someone comes in to pick up or drop off taking the time necessary to establish what the customers expectations are and communicating whether or not we will be able to meet those expectations when they drop off along with being able to answer any questions and giving them an overview of what was done during the repair process goes a long ways.

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The average customer hears BLAH BLAH BLAH $1000.00. The customer call's another shop and hears BLAH BLAH BLAH $800.00. Verdict You are a rip off and they are not coming back.

 

 

Read the story of the Prodigial Customer (i mean son)

For me personally, if I'm speaking and the customer is hearing blah blah blah it means I failed that customer and in doing so I've failed myself as a shop owner. The essential challenge is to know the right way to speak to each customer that walks through that door in such a way that they hear what you are saying and not just the words you are using.

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For me personally, if I'm speaking and the customer is hearing blah blah blah it means I failed that customer and in doing so I've failed myself as a shop owner. The essential challenge is to know the right way to speak to each customer that walks through that door in such a way that they hear what you are saying and not just the words you are using.

 

Sadly Frogfinder is correct, and you are too, just to varying degrees. The average customer is the key here, all they know is the price. In order to elevate them from the average the key is to educate them and make sure they understand. But to many, too many actually in this economy and in general, the only thing that matters is what they know well, and that is price because they don't know anything else to ask. To the average customer all things are equal, except price. Isn't that what the retail giants have drilled into the consumer for decades? When we, the wise, know that to make the Walmart, Kmart, Target, Sam's, Costco price point the manufacturer may cut out a few thread count, extend the stitch length, remove a few pleats in the filter, lower the bag weight from 20#'s to 14#'s (Iams cat food for example), or change the model number slightly so it's not the same as the next guy so you can't compare. The manufacturer's got smart and in order to meet price points they made changes to accommodate the demands of lower prices. But the average consumer doesnot know, and does not care.

 

In today's ever increasingly narcissistic society all the average customer wants is what they want, when they want it and at the CHEAPEST price they can get, in part because that is what the retail giants have told they want and have done a very good job at convincing them of such. And nothing you can do or say will change that. The people you succeed with are the ones who want your knowledge, skill and expertise. It's akin to the leading a horse to water. You can talk until you lose your voice, but if the consumer/customer/client does not care or want to hear what you have to say, it doesn't matter. I am not saying compete on price, absolutely not. But do not kid yourself, "If I'm speaking and the customer is hearing blah blah blah it means I failed that customer" used to be true, just like it used to be true that the quality of your work was the most important thing. Just like it used to be true that I was young, thin, good looking and had a full head of hair. But things change. Today's average customer/consumer/client is too self-absorbed to care what you have to say beyond what they want to hear. Remember the key was "The average customer." But I still like and follow your thinking while trying hard to evolve to accommodate the new reality of the average customer.

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Ever since I started working (in customer service jobs especially) I have always subscribed to the notion that there were three factors to every consumer's choice, in order of importance

1) Customer Service

2) Quality

3) Price.

 

Sadly that is not true any longer. I always thought that if a customer was treated really well they would accept slightly lower quality and a slightly higher price. The balance was very precarious but that was the order I believed was important to the consumer. But the more I do this as a shop owner the less I think quality and customer service are appreciated. They are expected, just not valued, and are disproportionately balanced with price. The average consumer expects 5 star service, Rolls-Royce quality at a Yugo price, and they think they are totally reasonable to expect it. And I think the average consumer is so wrapped up in themselves and their twit(ter) followers and farcebook "friends" that they think they are the only thing that matters in life so they are entitled to what they want and you are obligated to give it to them. And that is without regard to how they treat others. So great customer service is unappreciated and unrewarded, it is expected, even though it is often not delivered. And regardless of whether or not you discuss the quality and expected lifespan of a repair, in the customer's mind they paid for it once, and they should never have to have it fixed again. Even when they come in, "OH man I'm selling this thing, can you fix it any cheaper?" You lose your mind for the afternoon, put on that cheaper than El Cheapo part and 17 months later they are still driving the car they were going to sell and when the part fails all you hear is "But you just replaced that!" You can look at this from several different view points, you provided the customer service that was expected, you fixed the car they told you they were going to sell. You served their expressed need for a cheap fix, after all what you put on was better than what you took off, right? And all they wanted was to get it to where they could sell it. But they played you. They didn't care about you, about quality, or about their relationship with you. All they cared about was themselves and what they wanted, a cheap fix. So nothing really matters anymore to the average consumer except for themselves, and price.

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I TOTALLY AGREE! Anybody out there that thinks they can talk EVERY customer into contributing to their business is a FOOL. You're not going to get along with everybody... you're not going to have the price that everyone can agree on. If IT was true, and you could please everyone every time... what the hell would the rest of the shops in town be repairing? You'd be the only one in business because you're SO perfect.

 

Yea, sure, right...you're going to retain every customer that comes thru the door... and if you couldn't tell... I'm not one of those people you can please every time.... LOL Since I've been there, seen it, done it, bought the T shirt... and ... yea... I really did write the book about it. LOL

People are people... you can try to please them all, I already know it's NOT possible... more than likely all you're going to get for all your efforts are gray hairs and a prescription for prosaic.

 

And you're right about the Blah, Blah part... some people only care about the price, not who does the work..........................................................

 

 

 

 

re not coming back.

 

 

Read the story of the Prodigial Customer (i mean son)

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Sadly Frogfinder is correct, and you are too, just to varying degrees. The average customer is the key here, all they know is the price. In order to elevate them from the average the key is to educate them and make sure they understand. But to many, too many actually in this economy and in general, the only thing that matters is what they know well, and that is price because they don't know anything else to ask. To the average customer all things are equal, except price. Isn't that what the retail giants have drilled into the consumer for decades? When we, the wise, know that to make the Walmart, Kmart, Target, Sam's, Costco price point the manufacturer may cut out a few thread count, extend the stitch length, remove a few pleats in the filter, lower the bag weight from 20#'s to 14#'s (Iams cat food for example), or change the model number slightly so it's not the same as the next guy so you can't compare. The manufacturer's got smart and in order to meet price points they made changes to accommodate the demands of lower prices. But the average consumer doesnot know, and does not care.

 

In today's ever increasingly narcissistic society all the average customer wants is what they want, when they want it and at the CHEAPEST price they can get, in part because that is what the retail giants have told they want and have done a very good job at convincing them of such. And nothing you can do or say will change that. The people you succeed with are the ones who want your knowledge, skill and expertise. It's akin to the leading a horse to water. You can talk until you lose your voice, but if the consumer/customer/client does not care or want to hear what you have to say, it doesn't matter. I am not saying compete on price, absolutely not. But do not kid yourself, "If I'm speaking and the customer is hearing blah blah blah it means I failed that customer" used to be true, just like it used to be true that the quality of your work was the most important thing. Just like it used to be true that I was young, thin, good looking and had a full head of hair. But things change. Today's average customer/consumer/client is too self-absorbed to care what you have to say beyond what they want to hear. Remember the key was "The average customer." But I still like and follow your thinking while trying hard to evolve to accommodate the new reality of the average customer.

I hear what your saying, it goes back to my statement in an earlier post about finding out what the customers expectations are to see if those expectations are able to be met. If they are to hung up on price and little else I don't waste all that much time trying to educate. I'm less then 3 years in business and still learning and tweaking how I do things but what does stick in my mind from the feedback I have heard from customers is they like that I explain things to them.

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HOWDY,

My take on the average customer was a borrowed parable from Homer Simson. Bart was talking to his dog and all the dog heard was "BLAH BLAH BLAH SPOT BLAH ........................ :rolleyes:

 

That being said I say Focus on what you do/love best and become so good at doing that people will pay you very well not to stop doing what you love doing. Twenty percent of your customers provide eighty percent of your revenue. Every customer can refer you a $500.00 job if you will will ask them to. Offer every customer a cold drink , a courtesy ride and extra business cards. B)

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Wow, what a discussion…please hear my take on this…

 

People focus on price because we are a price-driven industry, and like it or not much of what we sell has been reduced to the status of a commodity. Every week at the supermarket we price milk, eggs, orange juice and Pepsi. When we need gas for our cars the first thing we do is look at the price, right?? Well, it’s the same with auto repair. I hate to tell you this, but it’s our own fault, not the public.

 

How many of you ride a Harley Davidson? Would you ever consider another bike? Were you inconvenienced by the wait the last time you ordered your bike? Does Harley produce the cheapest motorcycles? No. It’s debatable that it produces the best machine, nor is a Harley dealership considered the “friendly service” in town. But the fact is no one cares about the price or service….as a matter of fact many will tattoo the Harley logo on their arm!

 

Let me go step further, people who DO NOT ride a Harley, who have even never been on a motorcycle, will wear Harley Davidson clothes. The market of non-motorcycle riders who purchase Harley Davidson clothes and other apparrel represents 12% of Harley Davidson gross sales!!! Again, price never enters into the picture.

 

I don’t know how to do it, but we must move away from price. This “price” thing bothers me as much as anyone. I know one thing that no one can refute: If we sell our company brand like a supermarket sells a dozen eggs or milk, we are in trouble. In other words, if we identify our business by the parts and services we sell, then the consumer will judge you by what you sell. Price becomes the only determining factor, because YOU told him that.

 

I have been thinking for a while to position my shop in a different light. I am re-branding my culture and targeting consumers who want my type of culture, those people who don’t want the status quo. People who will allow me to take care of their car and family because they believe in me and my people, just like a family or friend.

 

When and if I figure it out I will let you know…

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Wow, what a discussion…please hear my take on this…

 

People focus on price because we are a price-driven industry, and like it or not much of what we sell has been reduced to the status of a commodity. Every week at the supermarket we price milk, eggs, orange juice and Pepsi. When we need gas for our cars the first thing we do is look at the price, right?? Well, it’s the same with auto repair. I hate to tell you this, but it’s our own fault, not the public.

 

How many of you ride a Harley Davidson? Would you ever consider another bike? Were you inconvenienced by the wait the last time you ordered your bike? Does Harley produce the cheapest motorcycles? No. It’s debatable that it produces the best machine, nor is a Harley dealership considered the “friendly service” in town. But the fact is no one cares about the price or service….as a matter of fact many will tattoo the Harley logo on their arm!

 

Let me go step further, people who DO NOT ride a Harley, who have even never been on a motorcycle, will wear Harley Davidson clothes. The market of non-motorcycle riders who purchase Harley Davidson clothes and other apparrel represents 12% of Harley Davidson gross sales!!! Again, price never enters into the picture.

 

I don’t know how to do it, but we must move away from price. This “price” thing bothers me as much as anyone. I know one thing that no one can refute: If we sell our company brand like a supermarket sells a dozen eggs or milk, we are in trouble. In other words, if we identify our business by the parts and services we sell, then the consumer will judge you by what you sell. Price becomes the only determining factor, because YOU told him that.

 

I have been thinking for a while to position my shop in a different light. I am re-branding my culture and targeting consumers who want my type of culture, those people who don’t want the status quo. People who will allow me to take care of their car and family because they believe in me and my people, just like a family or friend.

 

When and if I figure it out I will let you know…

B) Birds (customers) of a feather flock together.

:rolleyes:

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Wow, what a discussion…please hear my take on this…

 

People focus on price because we are a price-driven industry, and like it or not much of what we sell has been reduced to the status of a commodity. Every week at the supermarket we price milk, eggs, orange juice and Pepsi. When we need gas for our cars the first thing we do is look at the price, right?? Well, it’s the same with auto repair. I hate to tell you this, but it’s our own fault, not the public.

 

Agreed, we talk and complain about the bottom feeder shops weekly, about the shops that want to be the cheapest because that will get them lots of business and the think that will make them boatloads of money. We all know that isn't true, it will get them business but not the type that keeps the doors open. Every trade charges what they do for a reason. Why do you think a lawyer charges $250, $500, $2000 an hour? Because that is what they need to charge to pay for the law books, research staff and a good living. They get it because they all charge it. That and they all have to meet a certain standard for their profession, a little thing called the Bar exam. Likewise plumbers get to charge what they do, because they all charge similar amounts and I assume that like electricians they must apprentice and journey and finally "graduate" to a certain status by law, statute or ordinance. But we allow these cut rate shops to operate because we as an industry do not require higher standards of ourselves. Why do we allow this, because heaven forbid that if we were required to meet minimum standards there would have to be a governing body, maybe even (gasp) The Government to oversee and enforce those minimum standards. But we as an industry have no interest in establishing those minimum standards and the trade organizations that supposedly foster improved professionalism, integrity, and certify competence really are all voluntary organizations that do little to advance our profession beyond those of us who voluntarily adhere. But those cut-rate shops, do you think they adhere? No, that's part of how they can charge less. So yes Joe, you are right, it's our fault that our profession is not held in higher esteem. It's our fault because we are not willing to impose minimum standards on our profession that would earn us the esteem we want and many of us deserve.

 

 

How many of you ride a Harley Davidson? Would you ever consider another bike? Were you inconvenienced by the wait the last time you ordered your bike? Does Harley produce the cheapest motorcycles? No. It’s debatable that it produces the best machine, nor is a Harley dealership considered the “friendly service” in town. But the fact is no one cares about the price or service….as a matter of fact many will tattoo the Harley logo on their arm!

 

Let me go step further, people who DO NOT ride a Harley, who have even never been on a motorcycle, will wear Harley Davidson clothes. The market of non-motorcycle riders who purchase Harley Davidson clothes and other apparrel represents 12% of Harley Davidson gross sales!!! Again, price never enters into the picture.

 

Rebels without a clue. A truly phenomenal marketing feat that is for sure. But like crapple products, it's what's "cool" not what's intelligent, smart, reasonable or prudent. But it would be nice to sprinkle some of that pixie dust on our profession and elevate the image, and value.

 

I don’t know how to do it, but we must move away from price. This “price” thing bothers me as much as anyone. I know one thing that no one can refute: If we sell our company brand like a supermarket sells a dozen eggs or milk, we are in trouble. In other words, if we identify our business by the parts and services we sell, then the consumer will judge you by what you sell. Price becomes the only determining factor, because YOU told him that.

 

But what else are we supposed to sell the customer? They have a need for the coolant leak on their car to be fixed, or the grinding brakes to be replaced. What else are we supposed to sell them? How else are we supposed to sell them? I think part of the problem is education. So many people simply know to turn the key and if it starts, DRIVE IT! They don't know that the premium brake pads will stop stronger, shorter, and more reliably than the $19.95 brake pad in the $99.00 brake job. All they know it that 99.9% of the time they step on the brake pedal and the car stops. It's that .1% of the time that the 10 foot shorter stopping distance will be the difference between driving away, heart pounding and riding away in an ambulance. I used to try to sell my brake jobs with premium parts that way, most people stopped listening after premium, in their minds premium simply equaled more $$$, nothing else, not better quality, better performance, more safety, just more money. I helped a guy tie down a heavy load in his pick-up one day and told him to place the load as far forward as possible because he could control how fast he had to accelerate but he couldn't control how fast he may have to stop. He gave me this deer-in-the-headlight look like I was crazy. But the next time I talked to him he thanked me for insisting he do that, because he had a kid blow a stop sign and he had to slam on the brakes and heard the load tilt forward and tap the front of the truck bed. If it had been all the way to the back like he wanted for easier unloading he would have at least broken the rear window in the cab as the load broke free and slid forward. He finally got it, but if he hadn't had that pseudo-emergency, just like the other 99.9% of the time, I would still be crazy for wanting him to work harder to load and unload his cargo.

 

So maybe it isn't entirely our fault that our profession is regarded as the physical work we perform, not the experience, care and concern we have for our customer's and their family's well-being manifested in a job well done with high-quality parts and top-notch labor that will provide a long term solution to their need for reliable vehicles.

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Maybe it’s hard for us to realize this, but when ask ourselves what business are we in, we typically say something like: auto repair or auto service or something similar. Right? Well if you think about, there are a million shops out there doing the same thing.

 

In other words, WHY do people come to you? People can buy a Goodyear tire anywhere. People can buy brakes anyway. People can get an oil change anyway. Repairing cars is WHAT we do, not WHY we do it.

 

Find out WHY you are in business, promote that to your consumer base and your staff and maybe you and your customers may look at your business a little different.

 

People buy Apple computers because of the culture Apple built. Apple attracts a certain part of the consumer market who WANTS to buy Apple.

 

Those people don’t care about the price, nor do they compare Apple to a PC. Why? In their minds there is no comparison. Apple did a great job to market their product so different from the status quo, which makes people buy Apple because they believe in it.

 

The consumer does not really know If Apple is really any better, nor do they know the technical aspects of an Apple computer. AND, Apple does not market this….they market the culture of the company.

 

I hope I am not confusing the issue, but if we make price the motivator, we lose. If we tell people that we do brakes, alignments, oil changes, steering, timing belts, check engine lights…..so what? At that point the only thing people can judge you on is price.

 

No matter what the consumer education is, most people don’t know the difference between a Hunter Road Force tire balance and tire balanced with a bubble balancer, nor do they truly care.

 

THEY KNOW YOU, THEY TRUST YOU….THAT’S WHAT WE NEED TO SELL

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I know that we all may be different about why we do business but what is the why for you Joe?

 

While working at a Ford dealership in the late 70’s, at the ripe old age of 24, I became extremely disillusioned by the auto repair business. I felt that both the customers and the mechanics were not treated with great respect and that was the cause why the public did not have a very good image of our industry. I was tired of hearing that mechanics rip people off.

 

I made a vow that I would change the image of the auto repair business, by treating people with respect, both techs and customers. I wanted to build a facility with class and convey the image of professionalism. I wanted to raise the bar so that people will grow to respect our industry, a place where techs will want to work because they feel they are respected too.

 

So in 1980 I opened my repair shop.

 

I am still working on my WHY, but feel that I have made a difference. My WHY is also the reason I cofounded AutoShopOwner.com. I wanted to bring a higher level of professionalism to our industry.

 

WHY I get up in the morning is to make a difference in this world, to be better today than I was yesterday….I happen to do that by owing a repair shop.

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      Pricing and Competitiveness: pricing is based on other businesses, economics/market conditions/competitors, sales force determination, and dealership prices. They do not understand where the price comes from.  Price comparing: asking why it's a considerable difference, asking to match the price, questioning labor prices, see a breakdown of prices. Be competitive, but you don’t need to match. Charge appropriately for your shop. Recovery- KIA EV battery issues- irritated loaner was a gas vehicle, KIA wrote check to cover gas during time they had car (for few months), “fix the problem so well they cant wiat for it to happen again.” KIA was understanding of their individual customer. Have a plan/procedure in place. Have a ‘discount’ budget to use- empower your people. LISTEN  Have the right people in place Complimentary Elite Customer Care Guide Template HERE  
      Connect with the Podcast:
      Aftermarket Radio Network
       
      Subscribe on YouTube
      Visit us on the Web
      Follow on Facebook
      Become an Insider
      Buy me a coffee
      Important Books
      Check out today's partner:
      Learn more about NAPA AutoCare and the benefits of being part of the NAPA family by visiting www.NAPAAutoCare.com
         
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • By carmcapriotto
      Customer amenities aren’t just a snack bar and some coffee k-cups. It takes more to deepen a relationship.  My panel of shop owners goes beyond the free wifi and beverages to really wow their customers and make that lasting impression. Amenities are your ultimate marketing tool for your business. Take Note!
      Rachel Spencer, Spencer’s Auto Repair, Krum, Texas. Rachel’s Previous Episodes HERE
      Matt Lachowitzer, Matt’s Automotive Service Center, Fargo-Moorhead, North Dakota and Minnesota. Listen to Matt’s previous episodes HERE Jorge Gilligan, Revolution Motor Works, Finksburg, MD Listen to Jorge’s Episodes HERE. Key Talking Points
      Why Amenities- loaner cars, coffee, tea, branded water bottle, free wifi, hand sanitizers, ice scrappers, little things make a big difference. Customer experience- ‘be so good they won’t forget you,’ it’s your ultimate marketing tool. Customers expect the repair to be done correctly, but what gives them a lasting impression? As an owner, show your team members and vendors the same amount of service as you do your guests FORD- family, occupation, recreation, dreams Any car seat gets a buckled bear in the car seat by technicians- notes are saved in a customer file Wow Budget- empowered employees Swag- normally under $1, $30-40 swag bag for VIP customers “Any way you slice it, we’re grateful for you” $1 pies for customers with VIP card “Thanks for being the heart of our business” Valentine’s day mug of treats “Thanks for making our spirit’s bright” Christmas Candle “We like the way you roll; thanks for coming in.” Tootsie roll  
      Connect with the Podcast
       
      Aftermarket Radio Network
      Subscribe on YouTube
      Visit us on the Web
      Follow on Facebook
      Become an Insider
      Buy me a coffee
      Important Books
      Check out today's partners: Shop-Ware: More Time. More Profit. Shop-Ware Shop Management getshopware.com       Delphi Technologies: Keeping current on the latest vehicle systems and how to repair them is a must for today’s technicians. DelphiAftermarket.com
      Click to go to the Podcast on Remarkable Results Radio
    • Advertise your services or products to passers-by attracting them towards your business
    • By Joe Marconi
      The word OSHA makes many shop owners cringe. 
      I was lucky enough years back to have my insurance agent suggest I perform a voluntary OSHA inspection. A private company did it at the time.   
      They found tons of violations; some we knew would be flagged, but most we did not. 
      Have you ever had an OSHA inspection? And what can shop owners do to protect themselves? 


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