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xrac

WHY DO SOME SHOPS LIKE TO BAD MOUTH OTHER SHOPS

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I received a call Monday from a customer whose son had brakes replaced at a different Car-X in November while away at college.  The car had sat for some time and when the grandfather had driven the car he thought a front brake was locking up (I think all it was was noise from the rust coat after sitting).  He proceeded to take the car to a shop near their home.  This shop looked at the brakes and told the woman a bunch of stuff about how it looked like the rotors were never machined and that it was not professional work, etc.  She called me asking me what to do? I told her that all of the work done in November would still be under warranty and that if there was any problem it would be fixed at no charge unless we ran into something new like a locked up caliper.  I proceeded to call the shop where the worked was performed and had them fax me a copy of the paperwork so I would be prepared when they came in.  Later in the morning the car came in and the woman told us that when she picked the car up the owner of the shop that had raised all the red flags told her there was no problem with her car. The brakes were fine and the person who had called her should not have told her there were any problems. 

The other shop had created a problem where there was no problem at all.  I personally looked at the brakes and it reflected what was shown on the paperwork which was new pads and rotors on the rear, new pads and machine the rotors on the front.  You could tell by the rust on the rotors that it had been sitting for a while.  This other person created a problem where there was none, upset this woman, caused me to waste the other shop's time and my own time, and in the long run he only made their shop look bad.  Often shops like to degrade other shops thinking they will get ahead.  I have always felt like we all lose when this occurs because it just make consumers more distrustful.  The good shops in our town I consider to be friendly competition. If I run into a situation where there is a problem with their workmanship and the customer is returning to their shop I try to give them a call and an explanation of what we have found to be wrong and to give them a chance to be prepared to deal with the customer. 

 

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