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I get a text from one of my customers. It's a 1997 Kia Sportage with 160k miles on it. We fixed a severe oil leak exactly 6 days ago (they've been driving it for 6 days).

 

We replaced the oil cooler that attaches to the oil filter adaptor and hoses that run from the cooler to the head. We had to remove the intake manifold to do it. We didn't undo any fuel lines. There were no leaks from what we could see after we finished other than a severe exhaust leak.

 

She texted me that the oil light came on and the car shut off and that when they tried to crank it, fire started from underneath the vehicle. Fire was really bad and burned up pretty much everything in the engine compartment. Fire man said fire was too intense to know where it originated.

 

They are really nice people and feel really bad for them. They were texting me just to let me know what happened.

 

I am a really fair person and if this was our doing, then I would definitely take care of the situation in whatever way I can. Is this something my insurance should handle? Do you guys think it could have come from the repair we just did? We spent 2 weeks on this car because parts were special order for everything and it was a pain to work on as well. This job was already a loss to our shop but something like this just makes it worse. Also we are having one of the slowest weeks. Tough time financially, tough time for the customer, just overall a really bad situation.

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