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So right now we currently use townfair tire as our wholesale tire supplier. I contacted tirerack and set up a wholesale account and the prices are so much cheaper. I can get the same exact tire shipped to me with all costs for about 25 dollars cheaper a tire. Does anyone else use tirerack ? I'm just wondering if I should be bringing this up to my wholesale contact at townfair and seeing if he could change my pricing or what not. How are people competing in the tire market? i just can't seem to get good pricing on them.

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