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Eurozone_Motors

Garage keeper's insurance, Am I getting ripped off?

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Hey everyone, Ive lurked these forums for a long time while managing other people's shops and Ive decided to finally take the plunge. I shopped for an insurance quote and was given a price of 9k per year, this sounds extremely high to me. Is this a reasonable quote for a 2 bay shop in the Los Angeles area?

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