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alfredauto

saying no to certain jobs

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Do any of you just say no to certain jobs that are a guaranteed nightmare? Maybe Ztec timing belts or F150 exhaust manifolds to give an example. I do but I feel bad. I've done manifolds on newer trucks, booster comes off to drill out the studs, engine jacked up to drill another one, its just something I don't have any interest in doing. I have the tools, experience, and skill to repair pretty much everything, but some jobs are just not worth it to me. I can't count how many times both arms are coated in grease up to my shoulders and after ten hours its not even close to being done. Why did I take this job?

 

I hate to be a gravy tech or a gravy shop but if I'm turning down 5 brake jobs to do one rusted manifold what did I accomplish? Man card credit? Ego boost? Pride? No thanks I'll pass.

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Edited by skm
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