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(apologies, as I know this has been covered before. However, I could not find much when searching...)

 

We are currently in the process of standardizing the time we pay technicians for diagnostic work. We currently have no standard, so a typical Check Engine Light diagnosis will vary between 0.5hr and 1.5hr depending on how complex it is. Most is an ad-hoc discussion with the service adviser on "what's fair?"

 

Naturally, we would like to standardize this to something firm. Curious if your shops have a set policy on this?

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