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Maybe it’s the 40 years I have spent in this business, but these days I have little tolerance for certain things. One of those things: Catching a once-trusted employee lying to me.

 

To be fair, the years have also taught me to be more patient, more positive and help bring out the best in others. I find myself going the extra mile, spending time helping others and teaching others what I have learned through the years. In order to be successful in your life, you need to help others around you succeed in their lives.

 

So, perhaps it’s the fact that because I do spend so much time mentoring, I felt betrayed when this young tech did not tell me the truth. After all, look at the opportunity I am giving him?

 

The circumstances are not important. His actions are. When confronted, he openly admitted that he lied. The manager sent him home for a day to think about his actions. He is back at work and “appears” to have gone through an epiphany. But, we shall see.

 

Another thing the last 40 years have taught me: Above all maintain your integrity and core values. Oh, and learn to forgive.

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