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So as a few of you know I got into selling used cars as a supplement to the garage work. It generates headaches faster than it generates cash. Here's what's on my plate for this week: a girl bought a pacifica from me with 90k miles. Paid about $5k. I made $800. Clean car, no issues. I gave her a written 30 day warranty per NY law. That was in February. The first I hear back from her was last week, she is suing me in small claims court for $3,800. Huh? She claims she spent that much in repairs the last month and I'm responsible. So while the car was under warranty it didn't break. In the first 4 months of ownership it didn't break. Now 5 months later and 10,000+ miles something broke and its 100% my fault because I sold it to her. It really blows my mind the mentality of some people. The sad part is if any of my paperwork is out of order I'll probably have to pay her something. If she's friends with the judge I'm really screwed. Since when is a car dealer responsible for the life of a car? I just don't get it.

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