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Junior

Warning Dayco Timing tensioner failure!

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Just ran into a serious issue that I want to give you guys the heads up on before it costs you a big headache. The last two Subaru timing belt jobs we did used Dayco kit, the tensioner bearing failed. The first one was after 39 miles, the second one only lasted 19 miles. These were sourced through Advance. Looks like the second one may have cost the engine.

 

I'm waiting to hear back on what happened in the manufacturing process that caused the failure. We have installed tons of these kits with no troubles and have two failures in a row now, something has gone sour.

 

Save yourself the headache, skip the tensioner or install OE on this one. Will post back with more details once I get an answer.

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Edited by Junior

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