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A BAD REVIEW ENDS UP A BOOST IN MORALE


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  • 3 weeks later...

Joe has hit another home run in the September issue. This us a truly great column with great writing.

 

http://www.ratchetandwrench.com/RatchetWrench/September-2014/Never-Lose-Sight-of-What-You-Stand-For/

 

Thanks Frank, I try to write real-life stories because I know we can all relate. Plus, I do enjoy writing.

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