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Agree completely. We have more pull in volumes. I think the more attention we bring to the issue and the more folks who speak out the better chance we have at improvement. As you know I've been in contact with my reps. If anyone has input on addressing this on a wider scale I'm on board!

 

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I agree 100%.   But one question about dealer part comebacks.  When I get a comeback my parts places will let me submit a labor claim so I can be reimbursed some labor.  What happens when a dealer part fails?  Are we out the labor and they just warranty the part?

Ford is the only one that I know of that offers labor compensation.

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

I agree with the parts quality, frustrating at best. I don't see a solution, new cars are made cheaper every year with parts that are designed to be just good enough. We had a 2012 Hyundai sonata in today 44k miles and the starter was junk. 2014 Subaru 7k miles tranny leaking like a faucet. Dealer took the hit on both under warranty but it scares me to see the crap the manufacturers are producing. Hopefully the aftermarket will step up and make parts superior to the OEM, we are starting to see it on some items. Steering racks are a sore spot with me, Try a Cardone rack sometime and see if outlasts the test drive. Nothing like doing a job 2 or 3 times to make a tech want to quit.

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         5 comments
      I recently spoke with a friend of mine who owns a large general repair shop in the Midwest. His father founded the business in 1975. He was telling me that although he’s busy, he’s also very frustrated. When I probed him more about his frustrations, he said that it’s hard to find qualified technicians. My friend employs four technicians and is looking to hire two more. I then asked him, “How long does a technician last working for you.” He looked puzzled and replied, “I never really thought about that, but I can tell that except for one tech, most technicians don’t last working for me longer than a few years.”
      Judging from personal experience as a shop owner and from what I know about the auto repair industry, I can tell you that other than a few exceptions, the turnover rate for technicians in our industry is too high. This makes me think, do we have a technician shortage or a retention problem? Have we done the best we can over the decades to provide great pay plans, benefits packages, great work environments, and the right culture to ensure that the techs we have stay with us?
      Finding and hiring qualified automotive technicians is not a new phenomenon. This problem has been around for as long as I can remember. While we do need to attract people to our industry and provide the necessary training and mentorship, we also need to focus on retention. Having a revolving door and needing to hire techs every few years or so costs your company money. Big money! And that revolving door may be a sign of an even bigger issue: poor leadership, and poor employee management skills.
      Here’s one more thing to consider, for the most part, technicians don’t leave one job to start a new career, they leave one shop as a technician to become a technician at another shop. The reasons why they leave can be debated, but there is one fact that we cannot deny, people don’t quit the company they work for, they usually leave because of the boss or manager they work for.
      Put yourselves in the shoes of your employees. Do you have a workplace that communicates, “We appreciate you and want you to stay!”
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