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Spring Compressor - OTC or Branick?


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Need to upgrade our spring compressor, older Branick model struggles with hefty springs and that’s just downright dangerous. Looking to upgrade but not sure about which unit to get. OTC-6591 StrutTamer or Branick 7400. The Branick unit looks stronger but I don't like how you can't get on top of the strut with an impact without using a swivel. Which one do you have, would you recommend something else? I'm wondering how these machines tame really high spring rates in things like Toyota Tundas and BMW SUV springs, things our current machine can't really do safely.

 

thanks!!

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OTC Tamer, hands down. I used the Branick at the dealership, and I have a OTC Tamer now in my shop. I cannot express how much better the OTC is, especially the safety aspect of the OTC design...

 

I'll put it this way, if I was a tech in a shop and my boss was buying a new strut compressor and he picked the Branick over the OTC... I'd be pissed. Seriously is that much better. I used to HATE doing struts. Now, I love it.

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  • 5 months later...

We ended up getting the OTC and I think its overall a better design. It easily compresses even strong truck struts and is easy to fit and access the strut while working on it. My only issue is that the locking bolts for each arm should have wing nuts of thumb screws on them, not just regular bolts, they are only supposed to be finger tight but the hey head makes it awkward to do. I just haven't gotten around to replacing them yet.

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