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Cell phone use and too quick to judge

 

I was in a clothing store at the local Mall yesterday with my wife. How she convinced me to go to the mall is another story for another day. I spotted a woman on her cell phone between racks of clothing, as if she was hiding. Immediately to myself I thought, “This woman has got to be kidding. The store is packed with customers and the line at the register is a mile long, and she is on her cell phone?”

 

A few minutes later, the same woman was at the register and someone walked in and asked her, “How’s your husband doing?” The woman replied, “I just got a call from the doctor and he is still in critical condition, but it looks like his liver is not as bad as they thought.”

 

At this point, I realized that her time on her cell phone was not to duck work, but was actually something of grave importance.

 

Sometimes there are extenuating circumstances, a lesson for all not to be too quick to judge until all the facts are in.

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