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I would like to come up with a chart that will help me know how much to charge for diagnostics.

This is what I have so far. Any input will be appreciated.

 

Level 1

Fluid Check

Air/ Check tires On level 1 I would like things that can be diagnosed visually. I can come up with a reasonable price to charge the Scan Codes customer. I also thought about just charging 0.5 hours but it seems that is not working out too good, plus i dont think is fair to charge $40.00 for fluid check or just to check tires.

 

Level 2

Wheels

Axle

Front, Rear Suspension On Level 2 I would like to list things that I know my techs need to take parts off to be able to check the

problem.

 

Level 3

Engine noise

Cooling system On Level 3 Cars that need to stay over night or takes 1+ hours to diagnosed.

Fuel System

Transmission

 

 

I hope this is a good idea for me to stay on track.

What do you guys think? Good idea? Should i just charged 1 hours minimum of diagnostic time?

 

 

 

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