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Kid left his car with me 4+ years ago, Dad just contacted me

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Odd ball X-Mas Eve question.

 

Kid dropped off a 1998 528 4+ years ago. Came by a few times to check up on the car (wanted some electrical work done) then dropped off the face of the earth. Car had an engine swap and wasn't starting due to harness/computer issues. Tried contacting the customer didn't respond for months. After about 2 years, we decided enough was enough (I know i have patience!). Never got a dime from kid. Ended up sending it to the scrapper. Fast forward another 2+ years, got a call from the kid's dad apparently asking about the car. Told him his son left the car for 2 years and we had no contact from him so we junked it. Asked for paper work which I don't even think I have anymore (moved locations).

 

How would you guys have handled this situation? Not sure if I am liable for anything but I was pretty shocked and annoyed someone would call and ask for the car and then give attitude and demand paperwork. I even told him what if I left my car in his driveway for 4 years, what would he end up doing. I could careless at this point, he can take me to court if he wants. Just wanted to hear some of your thoughts.

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