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Kid left his car with me 4+ years ago, Dad just contacted me

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Odd ball X-Mas Eve question.

 

Kid dropped off a 1998 528 4+ years ago. Came by a few times to check up on the car (wanted some electrical work done) then dropped off the face of the earth. Car had an engine swap and wasn't starting due to harness/computer issues. Tried contacting the customer didn't respond for months. After about 2 years, we decided enough was enough (I know i have patience!). Never got a dime from kid. Ended up sending it to the scrapper. Fast forward another 2+ years, got a call from the kid's dad apparently asking about the car. Told him his son left the car for 2 years and we had no contact from him so we junked it. Asked for paper work which I don't even think I have anymore (moved locations).

 

How would you guys have handled this situation? Not sure if I am liable for anything but I was pretty shocked and annoyed someone would call and ask for the car and then give attitude and demand paperwork. I even told him what if I left my car in his driveway for 4 years, what would he end up doing. I could careless at this point, he can take me to court if he wants. Just wanted to hear some of your thoughts.

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      Not to be outdone, the very next one was another piece of work. Lost horsepower, wouldn’t shift right, and sounded terrible. What a horrid piece of machinery. Honestly, you could have scrapped the gunk off this engine into a rag and squeezed a quart of oil out of it. I managed to get the inspection cover off of the timing belt and just as I suspected the timing had jumped. Way overdue for replacement. It’s not only going to need a new belt, but a bath before I work on this hunk of junk, and then… who knows what I’ll find. It just never ends.

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      Then… … … Hold on a second, listen. Do ya hear it? I hear the sound of a gate creaking open, and the sounds of an old wore out motor. I can see plumes of black smoke and I can smell the burnt oil too! Oh no, they’re coming. Ok, who left the gate open! Here we go again….


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