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My Customer rant for the day.

 

I have a rather decent gentleman in this 30's that brings his 1998 528i to us. The first time we saw the vehicle was the beginning of the summer. The car looked like it had been sitting for the better part of a year. The owner told us he had let the car sit for a while but wanted to drive it for the summer and sell it when the summer was over. He brought the car in originally for a coolant leak. We diagnosed the problem to 2 hoses on the throttle body, fixed the problem, pressure tested, bled the cooling system, let sit at idle for an hour, test drove and sent it out.

 

Customer brings the car back a few weeks later with an overheating issue. Seems a little frustrated with the ol' "I brought the car in for an overheating issue and I still have the same problem." We diagnose the problem to a hose on the back of the head that wore out and blew off. I explained to the customer that the overheating was due to a new problem and the previous repairs were not the cause. We performed the same procedure, pressure tested, bled, idle, test, sent it out.

 

Customer again tows the car back a few weeks later again overheating. Now hes a bit more pissed off. Same old BS, "I am still overheating!" After the customer tells me the situation in which he started to overheat (bumper to bumper traffic dead heat of summer, AC on) I told him that it may be the aux fan not functioning properly. After we diagnose the problem it did turn out to be a seized fan. I again explained to the customer that it is a new problem and the previous repairs were holding. I then added that there is no way to tell what else he would need unless he wanted to preemptively replace his whole cooling system (which I do recommend to my customers but this being a 15 year old car he wasn't going to bite). Again we performed the same procedure, this time with the added test of the function of the fan and then we sent the car out.

 

Customer contacts me via facebook to tell me hes overheating again. Tells me that he doesn't want to pay a dime out of pocket because he thinks the fan is not working. I told him that we take care of our customers and if the fan is not working he is covered, just bring the vehicle in and we will get right on it.

 

A month later the customer arrives with the vehicle, this time he drove it in. Left the car with me on a Saturday and told him to wait a few days until next week and we will give him a call. We get to the car and first this is we notice there is a lot of smoke coming from the exhaust and the car is running a little rough. Already know potential headgasket issue. We pressure test the cooling system for good measure to check for leaks, there are none. We test the function of the fan, working perfectly. We trace a problem from the DME to the fan. No activation but signal coming out of DME. We check the fuse, getting power. Trace the problem to a break in the wire underneath the carpet somewhere. Before we go any further I contact the customer. I explain to him the situation but also that even if we fix the fan function issue (which was not our fault) he would still have a HG problem. He understands and wants to know what is going on with the car and authorizes us to pull the head.

 

Customer contacted me yesterday saying he would like to cancel the head check and would like to take the car. Ok no problem. Wants to have the car towed out today, no problem. I explain to him that there is a $60 diag/service fee and if he would like to pay over the phone with CC (which was a gift for the amount of time we spent tracing his wiring issue!). He says no problem, hed like to send the tow truck first and then drop by after work and settle up because he would like to pay in cash. I explain to the customer that we don't allow vehicles to leave out shop without settling the balance. Next i get a somewhat hostile message about how he doesn't appreciate that I am "holding $60" over his head when he had to tow the car back to the shop 3 times.

 

Some customers I want to throw into the river... :angry:

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Hahahahaha! It warms my heart to read things like this. Sometimes we get to feeling like we're the only shop that has to deal with these type of people by that's certainly not the case.

 

I recently had a honda civic come to the shop not running right at all. It had 177k and the original timing belt. I explained to the customer that I needed to install a new belt and get the car in time before I could further diagnose it.

 

After installing the belt we found cylinders 2&3 to be very low so I called the customer and spoke to his wife and explained the car needed an engine. She immediately started yelling at me saying "so you want $500 and you didn't fix the car!!." After listening to her for a minute I couldn't stand it and I explained to her that it was not my neglect that caused the engine to fail. I even tried explained to her that you can't do a compression test with the timing not correct.

 

Errrr, idiots

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I had a 7.3l come in about a month ago.

Stalled when warm, misfire and blue smoke. Find the hpop, icp amd uvch have been replaced. With key on fuel sprays into the valley and when the ebv valve is active oil is pouring down the back of the block. The column shifter is obviously missing bolts. The idm is throwing all injector open codes.

After proposing the first fixes (idm, shifter rebuild, fuel filter housing reseal, abs sensor rf and ebv rebuild) the customer informs me its been at another shop and they've replaced the the injectors with a stage one single shot and tuned it for the single shots. Mind you the truck runs factory exhaust and no gauges. Later he goes on to explain that 6 months after the injectors he was out of town and the truck quit so another shop replaced 1 injector with a factory unit. I instantly told him it must be replaced before diagnosis continues. He approves all work, and proceeds to calls at 6pm and leaves a message "my idm is under warranty, you cancel that order" .

I returned his call the next day and informed him that the part had been installed before he had called and had he informed me at the time of approval or within a business hours I could have likely returned the part before install.

After the idm we find a injector 4 open code a number 7 (factory style injector) contribution code. After calling his 3 mechanics and book keeper I find the origin of the aftermarket injectors and order a injector after verifying the new estimate with the customer explaining that these were all fix first type repairs and that due to the condition further work may be required. I attempt to do a compression test but the injector that was recently installed isn't correctly seated and leaks compression so I repair the shifter and other approved items. Once the jobs were complete we tested compression and found all lower than what I'd like to see and number 7 at 100psi.

Now the customer who approved all these repairs and understood the possibilities of more issues proceeds to explain how he only ment to do the work if it would fix it, and that he had no obligations to pay us, especially the $130 diagnosis or the idm because it was under warranty. Now its been here for 2 weeks awaiting payment of $1900.00

I instinctively take it personally and look for what I did wrong lol After reading these stories I realize his vehicle failing could fall on the door step of the other shops or him for poorly maintaining it but its not my fault, I've only performed services he approved that were required to properly diagnose his vehicle! I guess it goes to show we're the professionals and its our job to set expectations with our customers.

 

Sent from my SCH-I605 using Tapatalk 2

 

Edited by ncautoshop
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ncautoshop,

 

 

you have to expect this from a guy that has been to 3 other shops. They obviously have no loyalty and probably no respect for a professional automotive technician.

You're exactly right. Thats how he got here. He didn't want to pay to get it done right the first time, looked for the inexpensive options. Now the trucks got problems so he has no choice....and he still doesn't want to pay lol.

His son called today said I'll have a check monday and they'll pick it up later in the week. We'll see!

 

Sent from my SCH-I605 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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When I first started I hared calling customers with large repair estimates. Felt like I was the bearer of bad news. THEN...I had a long time shop owner ask me whu I felt that way. His reasoning was "it is not good or bad news for you. It is information the customer is paying for that you must share with them. It is only bad news if they have negleted the vehicle or failed to plan for such problems. No more or no less."

Now days I have no problem telling someone the cost and I am always prepared for the worst from them. A lot of it I blame on the manufacturers and dealers. They fail to go over the needs of the vehicle with the owner. And the makers seem to think that everything is a "lifetime" fluid/fill. The consumer is not prepared for the inevitable failures that are caused by this train of thought. Then you have the folks that are still living in the 60's that think a "tune up" should only cost $50 because that is what it cost on their 1955 belair! :huh::wacko:

I stopped taking the customer rants and screaming fits serious years and years ago. These days I'm writing them down...ROFL. AND...YES... you're only informing of the results, it ain't bad news or good news...facts are facts.

 

The last time I had a guy complain at the price of a tuneup and used the analogy of comparing it to 55 Belair I told him, "Step out here... you do it!" He shut up then and I went ahead with the tuneup. Well, it wasn't a tuneup after all it was a bad coil. DAH!?!

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Wow, what an absolute headache.  Looking forward to hearing the end of this saga.

Its been a real pain, what gets me is the whole time they've acted like I'm the problem of the equation. Not the poorly maintained truck or the other shops who either had no clue or just didnt diagnose.

It seems like our society looks to blame someone else for every single negative event? What happened to saying "I shouldnt have done that" or "that was my fault".

Now I've got a 95 2500 dodge in that shop that the track bar bracket is broken off the axle, the driver door opens randomly while driving and the tires rub suspension componets while going straight. They want the tps induced overdrive issue repaired and nothing more because I'm "trying to take advantage" besides he's driven the truck 5k this way "its been fine that long"

Some customers a laughable.

Its alot to do with the clientele in our area. For every 5 jobs you'll get 2 just like the ones above.

 

Sent from my SCH-I605 using Tapatalk 2

 

 

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  • 2 weeks later...

Customer comes in for a schedule appointment to diag a fuel pump issue. Tells me off the bat he want to replace the fuel pump. No problem. Wants to also replace springs. No Problem. Tell him that the part may take a while since it wasnt pre ordered and he is welcome to come back (after he thought he had to cab it home). Then drops the third party warranty bomb on me. Got them to approve of part of the bill without inspection (win!). Got the car back in the shop, replaced the fuel pump but too late to finish the springs. Had springs done the next day. Customer picks up the car and tries to negotiate the price a bit more which I politely shut down. Next day get a 4 star review (still not bad) and a comment that says we need to be more communicative with customers. WTF! I pushed you ahead of the line with the extra work you wanted, got the warranty to approve of part of the job, got the job done in a decently timely fashion and you still want to complain!!! Grrr.......

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Within the last year we started to do State emissions testing. We had this woman come in for a test and she asked if we could please check and adjust her tire pressures. After the employee did the emissions test he took the vehicle to a technicians work area to check the tires. When backing out he bumped a pole, damaging the bumper cover, creasing it in the rounded corner. I did the right thing, I told her about it. Even though the bumper was in poor condition to begin with.

 

I had her take it to a reputable body shop that we work with. She got her estimate, I offered cash or to pay the body shop after the work was done. She then asked me to fix the rear fender that was dinged, just because of the inconvenience. I told her no and she opted for us to pay the bill.

 

This morning she showed up and as promised, I had a loaner car for her to use so she wouldn't be inconvenienced while the repairs are being done. We have customers sign out the loaner cars by initialing boxes that state, they have a drivers license, insurance, no smoking, no pets and return the car with as much gas as it had when it left. She agreed and went on her way. Only to return about 10 minutes later stating "I want to rescind my signing that I will put gas back in the car. This is my inconvenience after all and I don't want to pay for the gas." I told her no. If she wasn't going to abide by the loaner car conditions, I can't let her use the car. "Is this how you treat your emissions customers. What would the State say about your contract?" I plainly told her that I wasn't performing an emissions when her car was damaged. I was doing a favor for YOU and now I'm paying for it.

 

Accidents happen. I just hate it when people try to take advantage of you. The body shop bill is going to be just over 700.00.

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Dang! DanW that really sucks. Yeah the sucky customers can bring you down. It bugs the crap out of me whenever I encounter one.

 

The 335i customer i complained about earlier, well he came back because he felt there was something stuck in his exhaust. I told him that I would be more than happy to drop the exhaust and inspect everything again HOWEVER if nothing is stuck in there then he would have to pay a $75 fee for dropping. After we checked it, nothing was stuck. Idiot now had a problem paying me. Stating he doesn't know if the problem is solved now (even after he physically saw nothing coming out the exhaust). I told him that we just dropped his exhaust and moved a bunch of stuff around, the sound very well might be gone RIGHT NOW, however if you drive down the road 5 minutes and the noise comes back that means I just did free work for nothing. I don't expect any customer out of the goodness of their heart to come back and pay me (was trying to get at i cant trust this knucklehead hes trying to get over already). Idiot says, "oh no I'm very honest" blah blah. Then we keep debating to the point where he starts to tell me that how we installed his downpipes were unnecessary as per a video his saw off a forum. WHERE DO THESE PEOPLE COME FROM!!!!!

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I failed to mention that the emissions tests are free to the customer and we only get paid 2.00 ea. HAHAHAHA!!!!!

The important question(S) is "Does your technician know how much it costs you?" and "Did you move either pole or the employee"?

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Both are still in place. Situations like this always seem to bring the best out in people! Growing up I was always taught to fess up when you make a mistake. (Within reason. Lets not get that righteous) The thought behind it is that "The truth shall set you free" I'm starting to think that is a bunch of Bravo Sierra. The customer has the right to be upset but, weeks later?

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Customer definitely has the right to be upset but should appreciate the honesty in coming forward and trying to make things right. I find it very uncouth that people tend to treat small businesses the way they treat big businesses. Big business has taught people that complaining will get you perks or best case scenario you'll get your way. They don't seem to understand that trying to get over on small businesses is hurting people that live in your community and regular folks just like themselves DIRECTLY.

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She would be paying for the gas in her own car! What's the difference! The entire populace should be required to work in retail at some point in their life. Most humbling jobs you will ever have. I feel bad when I go places and you can tell someone is just having a shitty day or dealing with terrible customers. I always reinforce them that I am fine, take your time and when you are ready to assist me, I will be right here.

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  • Have you checked out Joe's Latest Blog?

         0 comments
      It always amazes me when I hear about a technician who quits one repair shop to go work at another shop for less money. I know you have heard of this too, and you’ve probably asked yourself, “Can this be true? And Why?” The answer rests within the culture of the company. More specifically, the boss, manager, or a toxic work environment literally pushed the technician out the door.
      While money and benefits tend to attract people to a company, it won’t keep them there. When a technician begins to look over the fence for greener grass, that is usually a sign that something is wrong within the workplace. It also means that his or her heart is probably already gone. If the issue is not resolved, no amount of money will keep that technician for the long term. The heart is always the first to leave. The last thing that leaves is the technician’s toolbox.
      Shop owners: Focus more on employee retention than acquisition. This is not to say that you should not be constantly recruiting. You should. What it does means is that once you hire someone, your job isn’t over, that’s when it begins. Get to know your technicians. Build strong relationships. Have frequent one-on-ones. Engage in meaningful conversation. Find what truly motivates your technicians. You may be surprised that while money is a motivator, it’s usually not the prime motivator.
      One last thing; the cost of technician turnover can be financially devastating. It also affects shop morale. Do all you can to create a workplace where technicians feel they are respected, recognized, and know that their work contributes to the overall success of the company. This will lead to improved morale and team spirit. Remember, when you see a technician’s toolbox rolling out of the bay on its way to another shop, the heart was most likely gone long before that.
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