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I'm going to start negotiations this week on lease. It's a 2500 sq ft warehouse style building. Has office and 2 big bay doors with good high traffic road frontage(top 2 in town). The listing agent told my agent and I one of the other units in the complex got approved for $4 sq ft gross plus sales tax so that is my target price. Does anyone have any suggestions they wish they negotiated when the signed their first lease.

 

I'm looking for:

-3-5 year with option to renew

- I would love to limit my personal guarantee to the least amount of time though my hopes aren't that high(bank owned)

-CAM fee is included as well as waste

 

 

Any advise is always appreciate.

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