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Express oil change lanes

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I was just speaking with my banker the other day, and he made the following statement, "Yeah, I don't go to you guys for oil changes, since I know that it will take too long. Rather, I save the big stuff for you and go to Jiffy Lube where I can get in and out in 10 minutes."

 

This got me thinking a bit ... a ton of customers do this. We see them in our shops all the time with competitor's stickers on their windows and invoices in their glove boxes. They use us for the tough stuff but give the easy (and profitable!) work to the chain stores. Why? Convenience. Look at what most of these oil change shops do ... you drive in, stay in your car, they do the work and bring a credit card terminal to your window, and you are out of there in 10 minutes. Look at what we do ... they park, come in, talk to the service adviser, take a seat, wait .... wait some more ... wait some more. Maybe, they will be out of there in 30 minutes, but that's pretty optimistic. Many will be waiting there 45 minutes to an hour.

 

This got me thinking ... could I setup a couple bays in the shop to do just this? Has anyone in here had any luck with setting up some express lanes on the side of their shop? ...or even dug a pit underneath a few bays to allow the customer to stay in their vehicle?

 

Any thoughts on getting this work back into our shop would be much appreciated.

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