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Anyone else an absentee owner here? If so, how do you handle employees and daily work when you are not present? Things seem to be the complete opposite when I am not at the shop- cars are not check throughly, no motivation to sell additional services, cell phones used, techs sit around and relax when not busy, messy work environment etc.

 

 

Also, what do you do when the cash is short at the close of the day or when a tech renders service on a vehicle but does not charge for it- taking longer on the job than what we charge the customer?

 

 

Any thoughts or opinions regarding this matter are greatly appreciated.

 

 

 

Thanks,

 

 

 

John

 

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