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Hello! I would like some other auto repair shop owners opinion regarding how to make estimates for services & repairs. We have in the past itemized our estimates for customers (how much the part is and how much the labor is). But we have soon noticed that once the customer sees the price of the part, they get frustrated. For example, front brake pads parts: $79.99, Labor : $85. They claim "I can get the same part from an auto parts store for $30 bucks." What are you thoughts and how do you handle the estimate making process? An opinions for customers who tend to negotiate with prices?

 

Thanks in advance for your thoughts and opinions!

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