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Auto Parts Company Crosses the Ethics Line


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Auto Parts Company Crosses the Ethics Line

 

Its one thing to open a parts store and do free check engine light scans, battery testing, battery installation in the parking lot along with wiper blades. And, although I don’t agree, I can’t stop a parts company from selling $11.00 brake rotors and $17.00 O2 sensors to the general public.

 

BUT, it’s another thing for a parts rep to come into my facility and ask my lead tech if he knows of a tech that is looking for a job scanning cars and testing batteries outside the parts store. Or, approaching my service manager and asking him, if he knows of a manager that might be looking for a job at one of the parts store.

 

This crosses the line and I am furious. The way they did too is underhanded and unethical. This rep came in my HOUSE and in a “round about” way was actually trying to recruit my top people.

 

Business is Business, but this not about business. I will never buy anything from this company, not even if they are the only parts company in the world that has what I need. I refuse to patronize a company that has the morals of a worm.

 

Just to set the record straight; my number one supplier has been and will always be CARQUEST. I do deal with other local companies as my second call. The part company I am referring to in this post is not NAPA, AutoZone, O’Reilly’s, Auto Parts International or Pep Boys. Nor is it a small local company.

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There’s an old expression, “The fish stinks from the head down”, which obviously means that in most cases the culture of the company starts at the top, with management or even the owner.

 

The rep I am referring in this case is actually the district manager. Plus, from what I am hearing, it’s common practice among other area reps from this company.

 

I am not bragging when I say this, but my shop is the largest independent repair facility in my area. Other shops look to what we are doing. A clear message will be sent, just by my actions of refusing to conduct business with them.

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  • 1 year later...

Auto Parts Company Crosses the Ethics Line

 

Its one thing to open a parts store and do free check engine light scans, battery testing, battery installation in the parking lot along with wiper blades. And, although I don’t agree, I can’t stop a parts company from selling $11.00 brake rotors and $17.00 O2 sensors to the general public.

 

BUT, it’s another thing for a parts rep to come into my facility and ask my lead tech if he knows of a tech that is looking for a job scanning cars and testing batteries outside the parts store. Or, approaching my service manager and asking him, if he knows of a manager that might be looking for a job at one of the parts store.

 

This crosses the line and I am furious. The way they did too is underhanded and unethical. This rep came in my HOUSE and in a “round about” way was actually trying to recruit my top people.

 

Business is Business, but this not about business. I will never buy anything from this company, not even if they are the only parts company in the world that has what I need. I refuse to patronize a company that has the morals of a worm.

 

Just to set the record straight; my number one supplier has been and will always be CARQUEST. I do deal with other local companies as my second call. The part company I am referring to in this post is not NAPA, AutoZone, O’Reilly’s, Auto Parts International or Pep Boys. Nor is it a small local company.

 

 

once your guy saw what they were gonna pay him (even PT after you shop closes) he would have laughed. the store (AAP) wants you to know everything for nothing.

 

we have a part timer that works FT at a local shop, he works 8-12 hours a week for us, it helps with gas money for him, plus he can get insurance too. i do believe that he came to us though.

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once your guy saw what they were gonna pay him (even PT after you shop closes) he would have laughed. the store (AAP) wants you to know everything for nothing.

 

we have a part timer that works FT at a local shop, he works 8-12 hours a week for us, it helps with gas money for him, plus he can get insurance too. i do believe that he came to us though.

 

I never thought about that, thanks for the info. I still thinks it's dead wrong....

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